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  • Mount up! Saddle ring Marlin cowboy guns

    Harkening back to the good old "hell for leather" days of the U.S. cavalry, the saddle ring attachment on Marlin lever action rifles have been around for over a century and is still available (of sorts) today. Why the saddle ring? Close up of Marlin 1893 SRC .30-30 Win caliber saddle ring carbine via Collectors Arms European horse soldiers of the Napoleonic Wars often added a small carbine to their more traditional armament of saddle pistol, saber, heavy sword, and lance. At some point,...
  • Marlin Peep Sights 101

    Aperture sights, often just called "peep sights" have been around on Marlin rifles both from the factory and as an aftermarket accessory for more than a century. These sights are, for many, the best alternative to optics and have proven themselves for generations in both target and hunting applications. What are they? Basically speaking, peep sights work through a theory called parallax suppression (for an excellent 23-page explanation of just what this is). The concept goes that the human...
  • Marlin Rare Semi-Auto: The Open Bolt Marlin Model 50

    Odds are, you either cut your teeth on or have at least at one point in your life fired a Marlin semi-auto .22LR rifle. Today, the tube-fed Model 60 and its detachable-magazine Model 70 half-brother are the benchmark for rimfire auto-loaders around the world. Who would have thought that this all started in 84-years ago with the humble Model 50. Why was it born? Marlin, coming out of the "Roaring 20s" was a company looking to change. It had established itself with lever-action rifles and...
  • Marlin's Faux 22 M1 Carbine, the Model 989M2

    Today the AR-15 series rifles are perhaps the most popular semi-auto firearms in the country. In the early 1960s, when the AR was still unknown, the go-to rifle for medium game hunting and home defense was the M1 Carbine. With this understood, Marlin went about creating a M1-ish carbine for small game hunters and plinkers. This gun we know today as the Model 989M2. Just what was the M1 anyway? Formally, the "United States Carbine, Caliber .30, M1," but commonly just referred to as the M1,...
  • Understanding Shotgun Chokes

    Shotgun chokes were designed to control pattern diameters at different yards. What is a pattern? It is just the grouping of the pellets at a given yardage. This grouping or pattern is measured by a circle diameter. This particular circle must have certain efficiency. In other words, it has to have a certain number of pellets in a given area (called distribution) for it to be labeled an efficient pattern. Here is a quick reference chart: Shotgun Choke..... Yardage...........Shotgun Choke...
  1. Refinishing stock and effect on value

    I have a Marlin Model 50. This was an uncles gun that was sold to my father in the late 30's. It was passed to me by my father and used by myself and my sons. We now know it is a very limited edition gun, prototype of the action used by Annie Oakley in her trick shouting. I wander want to know if I refinish the stock will this devalue the gun. It is very chipped and scratched, I just had the action cleaned and have learned it was an action that can be converted from Semi Auto to Full Auto....
  2. Marlin 24 pump scatterguns scheme

    Dear colleagues; I have an old Marlin mod. 24 scattergun. I have problem with my shutgun, it was out of service some months ago. I need some help to repair it. Please, someone of you could send me an scheme of the gun, Someone of you could send me pictures of pieces, or the despieces of the gun. Best regards Thanks a lot
  3. Marlin's compact triple four, the Model 444P Outfitter

    Marlin has long been the king of lever action rifles, and without a doubt the .444 Marlin has been one of the most popular heavy rounds of the last half century, which could mean that the briefly made Outfitter model with its abbreviated barrel is the compact king of the woods. The Design of the .444 Marlin Round Taking a fat, wide-necked 57mm long case (almost as long as a 7mm Mauser's); the Marlin Company mashed a .429" round on top to create a moose of a cartridge. It was longer by...
  4. Cleaning and maintaining your rifles

    Marlin has long produced bolt-action rifles culminating with the MR-7 and later X7 series today as well as legacy semi-autos. However, keeping your rifle in tip-top condition is up to you. The primarily area of attacking the burnt carbon, metal shavings, and corrosive primer chemicals left behind by every range or field session is the barreled action. With a safe and unloaded weapon, with no brass or ammo around, remove your bolt and set it to the side. Next, use your cleaning rod in the...
  5. Timeline of the fight to defend the Right to Keep and Bear Arms (Infographic)

    First framed by founding father James Madison back in 1789, the fundamental rights protected under the Second Amendment of the Constitution to keep and bear arms have been under attack for centuries and withstood the test of time with both wins and losses for those who defend gun rights. With the current administration's efforts to paint certain classes of firearms as being, "not family heritage or family tradition," while advocating a ban in the same breath, it appears that the war is still...
  6. The shotgun that hits like a rifle: Marlin's 512 Slugmaster

    When the sabot slug hit the U.S. market in the late 1960s, it provided impetus for shotgun makers to design guns able to maximize the potential of these new rounds that could provide rifle-like accuracy out to a football field or more, effectively doubling the reach of the standard scattergun. This led to the Model 512. Marlin's flirtation with slug-guns Connecticut-based Marlin had been in the shotgun biz going all the way back to the 1890s. As the industry evolved so did the company,...
  7. Ultimate Marlin brush gun: The Model 62 Levermatic

    For a brief time in the 1960s, Marlin recast its vintage cowboy action rifle line into something a little more responsive and, using state of the art chamberings, was on the cutting edge of lever gun technology. Sadly, it wasn't to last. The Levermatic family Marlin firearms engineering guru Tom Robinson was issued patent number 2,823,480 Feb 18, 1956 for the Levermatic receiver, a system that he developed several years before from the Kessler Arms Company's "Lever-Matic" shotgun. What was...
  8. How short can you get? The pre-1934 Marlin SBRs

    In the 1930s, the wise members of Congress passed legislation that established the National Firearms Act, which regulated the civilian use and ownership of all the cool guns such as those, capable of full-auto fire, cane guns, pen guns, silencers, and short-barreled rifles. It is this last class that caught up a number of innocent Marlin lever guns in the dragnet. A rare Chilean police-marked Model 94 Marlin saddle ring trapper in .44-40 (with a 900-yard ladder sight!) and a super short...
  9. Mount up! Saddle ring Marlin cowboy guns

    Harkening back to the good old "hell for leather" days of the U.S. cavalry, the saddle ring attachment on Marlin lever action rifles have been around for over a century and is still available (of sorts) today. Why the saddle ring? Close up of Marlin 1893 SRC .30-30 Win caliber saddle ring carbine via Collectors Arms European horse soldiers of the Napoleonic Wars often added a small carbine to their more traditional armament of saddle pistol, saber, heavy sword, and lance. At some point,...
  10. Setting up your rifle

    Once you have your rifle and scope picked out, you have other considerations to make and other options to take when it comes to outfitting the final package. -Stock Ideally, your rifle should fit you as perfectly as if it was made for you by the god of war and handed down via a procession of his imps who laid it gently at your feet. Unfortunately, unless you go to a custom rifle maker and have it made to spec you are most likely left with having to work with what you have. However, do not...
  11. Marlin's Turn of the Century pump: The Model 19 shotgun

    Produced for a scant two-year period, the often-overlooked Marlin Model 19 was a scattergun with class that signaled the end of 19th century thinking and stepped boldly towards a modern design that we can appreciate today. Bloodlines A superb Marlin 1898 shotgun Starting in 1898 Marlin made its first slide or trombone action shotgun, the imaginatively named Model 1898. This remained in production for almost a decade when it was replaced by the "teen series" (M16 and 17) guns which gave...
  12. The Marauder: Marlin's short-barreled cowboy gun

    While no one ever accused the Marlin 30 series lever action rifle of being too long in the field, the company has from time to time flirted with chopping it down even further. One of the shortest of these was the briefly made 336 Marauder. Isn't it cute? The basic platform Way back in 1893 one LL Hepburn, a gunsmith at Marlin, was issued patent number 502,489 for a new locking bolt system with a two-piece firing pin and rectangular bolt that could be actuated by an under-rifle lever...
  13. The rock and roll Marlin: the M1918 BAR

    Today each Army and Marine fire team contains at least one hard charger who is designated the squad automatic weapon man. This position, first conceived back in 1918, was until the disco era composed of a Joe or Leatherneck armed with a BAR. What's a BAR you ask? (A Marlin-Rockwell M1918 BAR, via Julia auctions) John Browning's trench sweeper Officially designated "Rifle, Caliber .30, Automatic, Browning, M1918," this 16-pound light machine gun was revolutionary when it was introduced in...
  14. Marlins on the big screen

    When we saw that actor Chris Pratt, fresh of his movie success as Star Lord in Guardians of the Galaxy, is now rocking a Marlin 1895 SBL in .45-70 Government for his role as "Raptor Whisper" Owen Grady in the upcoming Jurassic World film (a rifle that we think goes great for velociraptor taming), we decided to look at some of the other Marlin screen roles out there. According to the good folks over at the Internet Media Firearms Database, who burn lean muscle tissue into the night analyzing...
  15. The Gentleman's Friend: Marlin's Standard Pocket Wheelgun

    The Marlin Firearms Company started in New England as a maker of small, pocket-sized revolvers-- often constructed entirely by hand-- and only later moved into rifles and shotguns. One of their most iconic 19th Century designs was the Standard. Marlin origins John M. Marlin was born in Connecticut in 1836 and as a young man worked in the Colt Factory in Hartford. When Colt went near belly up after the Civil War, Marlin ventured out on his own and started making derringer-style pistols by...
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