Ammo storage

Discussion in 'Ammo & Reloading' started by FOUR4D4, Oct 2, 2014.

  1. FOUR4D4

    FOUR4D4 Moderator Moderator

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    I remember when I didn't have to hoard ammo I could just shoot what I wanted and not worry about replacing it.

    All I had was 3 ammo cans one for handgun ammo,one for rifle ammo and one for shotguns shells and my new solution is not working so good I need to put dividers in an old gun cabinet,

    This just the hangun ammo
     

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  2. lingr

    lingr Well-Known Member

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    Ah yes, those were the days......
     

  3. hombre243

    hombre243 Well-Known Member

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    I bought 3 Plano or Flambeau plastic 2 gun handgun cases and 4 of the green ammo cans...Plano I think. I have 3030 ammo in one handgun case; 22 LR ammo in another handgun case and my HiPoint 45 and 9mm in the 3rd case. I have 45, 9mm, 7.62x54r and .308 ammo in the ammo cans, one for each caliber. I need more cans for loose loaded ammo. I have hundreds of empties and they will be bulk loaded just to get the components off the shelf.

    I also have 50 and 100 round ammo boxes of all calibers (loaded) setting on the shelf ready to be fired and placed in the rotation.

    I have the 3 lb coffee cans and 1 lb coffee cans full of cases of several sizes including .223 and 5.56 for use when I move into that caliber.

    No special cabinet for the ammo. Guns are cable locked in a floor mounted vertical 9 gun case. It is full and I need another one.

    I have a powder chest that will hold about 50 cans of powder. The opened cans are on a shelf and all other components are stored away from each other. I also have a trunk full of 7.62x54r FMJ ammo as well as some 150 gr SP reloadable ammo for the Mosin, and shotgun shells. Shot as well as slugs for my 20 ga.

    If I need ammo, I have a lot of a lot. I hope the floor holds it.
     
    Last edited: Oct 2, 2014
  4. Mauserhooked

    Mauserhooked Well-Known Member

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    I keep mine in wooden crates and military ammo cans stacked in the garage off the concrete floor. If I ever find any more .22 ammo, I'm going to try to stock up on that. Hard to believe that, as a youngster, everybody seemed to have .22 ammo. As expensive as ammo is nowadays, I may need to place that in my gun safes and put my firearms under the bed :rolleyes:....
     
  5. greyhawk50

    greyhawk50 Well-Known Member

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    I have 8-9 military ammo cans that I use for my hoard. Both the 30 cal. (22 lr.) & the 50 cal. sizes (center fire rifle & pistol). Also have a couple spare 50 cal. cans. I number the cans and keep a running log (inventory of) in a power point file on my laptop so I can get what I want w/o opening each can. Anything larger than the 30s & 50s isn't portable and would be used as a locker type storage.
    Also have an ammo cabinet on top of my gun safe where I keep the normal use stuff.
    I don't worry about shot shell other than keeping them in a dry environment and protected from freezing. Factory shells are sealed and I've (to date) not had an issue with reloads.

    Living where you do, freezing isn't a problem. Living up here, it is. I have heard and believe that the ammo should be kept in a cool (less than 90 degrees) dry place and it should never be subjected to freezing temperatures. There is also a concern for corrosion.
    With that said, I am a firm believer in airtight military ammo cans. They come in many sizes, even ones that are much larger than the 50 cal.s that I use. I bought mine years ago and paid $6 - $8 each. ($12 - $15 is the norm now-a-days)
    The ammo cabinet is on top of the safe in my computer room and the house is climate controlled (heat & AC). Problem solved.
    As for the airtight military ammo cans, moisture control isn't a concern because they are airtight. There are 3 thoughts to control moisture and or corrosion.
    1. Place a lit Tea Candle on top of the ammo before you close/seal the ammo can. Don't move it until the candle goes out. The candle will go out when the oxygen is burned up. Feel the lid to make sure it is cold before you move the can. End results, no oxygen - no corrosion. (theoretically)
    2. Activate a Chemical Hand Warmer and place it on the ammo before you close/seal the lid making sure it is activated and getting warm. Hand warmers operate on oxygen and remove most all oxygen from inside the ammo can.
    3. Save any/all descant pouches from prescription drugs. Keep them in a sealed medicine bottle until you need them. When I was working, I saved several larger ones that came with imported industrial equipment. You can also find them in boxes with new TVs and other imported electronics. Place a small hand full of the smaller ones (or one of the larger ones) in the ammo can before you close it up.

    As for my powder, I keep it in the basement. It is kept in the bottom drawer of a 2 drawer metal file cabinet. There are 2"X4"s under the cabinet to insulate it from the concrete floor. There is a moisture concern down there but I make sure the cap/lid has a seal and is securely in place. So far, no problems. The though process behind using a metal cabinet and storing powder in the basement is because of fire. If the house would catch on fire, fire burns up - not down. I just feel safer than having it upstairs and the work shop isn't climate controlled.
    I hope this helps. It has worked for me so far.
    If you find yourself with way more ammo than you can safely store, feel free to send the extra to me. It will be a challenge but I'll figure something out. :D I'll even pay the shipping.
     
  6. SWO1

    SWO1 Well-Known Member Lifetime Supporting

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    I've got a tall cabinet, Plastic, tupperware or someting from Lowes. Earlier this year my shelf of .22 collapsed and took the next shelf of Pistol Center Fire with it. I have since replaced the Plastic shelves with 3/4" plywood and secured to the sides with 2x2 runners screwed often. Ive added to them and no problems yet. I dont reload a big amout of center fire to store up. All the components are kept seperate, in cabinets, on selves and drawers. The .22 I cant do anything about, it just piles up.
     
  7. FOUR4D4

    FOUR4D4 Moderator Moderator

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    I know what you mean about the 22LR's piling up after 11,000 rounds I still don't have enough
     
  8. greyhawk50

    greyhawk50 Well-Known Member

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  9. FOUR4D4

    FOUR4D4 Moderator Moderator

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    No more like 1100
     
  10. Gumpy

    Gumpy AKA Richard Prestage

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    That Thar's still a lot of boolits! Lol
     
  11. straightshooter

    straightshooter Well-Known Member

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    I agree with mauser in that the ammo could be worth more than some of the guns that shoot them.
     
  12. greyhawk50

    greyhawk50 Well-Known Member

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    I totally agree. I like to have at least 100 rounds for every gun that I own, in most cases, more, along with dies & bullets where applicable.

    Cha-ching. Problem is that I buy, sell & trade frequently. Selling a gun with the ammo makes the price a little high unless the buyer is savvy in that respect. If they don't reload, I'm stuck with the dies.
    About 5 years ago, for obvious reasons, I began reducing my firearm inventory and investing the $$$ in ammo. Seen the writing on the wall. Not for the reason of resale but to prepare for the future. Worst case, it would work well as barter fodder if the dollar took a dive.
    Then came the desire for a CHL and the need to buy more guns, ammo & loading supplies to fit that niche.
    Sometimes it's hard to win. :eek:
     
  13. Bucky

    Bucky Well-Known Member

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    My setup consists of an old Electrical Cabinet, that the "Sparkie's" from work had thrown out.
    I welded, and locked in 2 bright pin rods, drilled them, so I can padlock the cabinet.

    As you can see when opened, I added shelves and try to keep some kind of order.
    Organized chaos !
     

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  14. straightshooter

    straightshooter Well-Known Member

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    I do believe I am going to have to build an ammo cabinet since the safe is not going to hold anymore. I have some plywood so I just need buy some 2x4 and build it. LOL Some sheets of plywood have some bullets embedded already.
     
  15. JesterGrin_1

    JesterGrin_1 Active Member

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    That is funny as I do not have a ammo storage problem as since I reload I just load what I will need. Now keeping brass separated is another problem lol. But really I use Zip Lock Bags for brass in different stages or Tupperware type containers for brass storage. :)
     
  16. straightshooter

    straightshooter Well-Known Member

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    Does your wife wonder where many of her Tupperware containers are?
     
  17. Centaur 1

    Centaur 1 Member

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    The Sterilite containers at Wally World are stackable and the handles swing around to lock the lids. I like to process my brass to the point where they're primed and ready to load. Then it's just a matter of adding powder and bullet before going to the range.

    Looking at the first picture I see a lot of the same ammo. You might save space by getting rid of the boxes and just dumping all the ammo into a storage container.
     
  18. FOUR4D4

    FOUR4D4 Moderator Moderator

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    This is similar cabinet im using
     
    Last edited: Dec 25, 2014
  19. Bucky

    Bucky Well-Known Member

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    FOUR4d4

    What, ???
    No hand loaded Ammo ?

    That's all I have !
     
  20. FOUR4D4

    FOUR4D4 Moderator Moderator

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    That's not mine the cabinet mine is similar I will take a picture soon.I haven't started reloading yet