Considering buying a Glenfield 75

Discussion in 'Marlin Rimfires' started by Soccernut, Jul 29, 2015.

  1. Soccernut

    Soccernut Member

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    I posted this on another website, but trying here as well.

    I have been looking for a .22 autoloader for a couple of weeks now. I don't have one. I have two single shots, one I have owned for almost 50 years. Just want something to target shoot and plink with. No hunting. No self defense. So I have been looking at all the older wood stocked rifles like Remington, Winchester, Savage, Marlin, etc. Today I found two Glenfields in a local pawn shop.

    Glenfield 60 with Glenfield scope (s/n 26xxxxxx, 1974?) for $120 in okay condition (lots of scratches and nicks, some words lightly carved in the stock, bluing worn on barrel tip, obviously been used).
    Glenfield 75 (s/n 72xxxxxx, 1972?) for $130 in fine condition (looks new except for one tiny nick in the stock).

    I am sure I can get these for much less than the sticker price. I am very interested in the 75 due to the apparent condition.

    My questions are:


    I am not going to be able to shoot them before buying so what should I look for?

    What are known issues with these 1970's vintage Glenfields? I read something about wear in the feed tube and the old style feed throat causing jams.

    What would be reasonable to get them for? I might try to get a two for one if I can get the prices down.
     
    Last edited: Jul 30, 2015
  2. MattNH

    MattNH Well-Known Member

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    Hi,

    You are correct on the years by serial numbers. Inside the rifles are identical. The 75 is a carbine version, so it has a shorter 18" barrel vs the 22" on the 60. This results in a smaller tube magazine capacity. The 75 also has a band around the forend tip. Internal parts are interchangeable between them with the exception of said magazine tube. Parts are readily available from multiple sources. It comes down to aesthetics and barrel length to which you prefer.

    Things to look out for include a bent ejector wire which will result in failure to eject and stovepiping. The trigger guards are susceptible to cracking from overtghtening. The buffer should be replaced. The recoil spring can get bent/kinked from reassembly. These vintage Marlins also have a two piece feed throat and if there are feed problems, an upgrade can be done to a newer style one pice but it involves modifying a side plate, a new lifter and new lifter/ejector wire spring.

    When it comes down to it, anything wrong with them can be fixed. I have a Marlin 99M1 which is e same as the Glenfield 75 but mine has the top handguard. I also have several Model 60s. Based on what I already have, I would go for the Glenfield 75 first, but probably go back and offer $210-$220 for both.

    Good luck and let us know what you end up with.

    Matt
     

  3. Soccernut

    Soccernut Member

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    I bought a JC Higgins 46C (Marlin 56). Decided that lever actions would be more fun to shoot and the levermatic is fast, fun, and accurate.
     
  4. SHOOTER13

    SHOOTER13 RETIRED MODERATOR Lifetime Supporting

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    I own a Marlin 80C circa 1960 I found on a toy gun rack at a farmers market back in the 70's and a Marlin Glenfield Model 60 circa 1980 that I was gifted by a friend.

    Each was a shooter to this day...

    As far as value and what to look for...I will defer to our resident collector and scholar...MattNH !!
     
  5. MattNH

    MattNH Well-Known Member

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    Excellent choice. My Marlin 56 is the first rifle I ever fired. My dad bought it used out of hardware store in the early 60s and I have it now. Easy on the dry firing of the 46C, the firing pin can round over a bit and a symptom would be light strikes.

    The age old question, if you could only keep 1, my answer each and every time will be that Marlin 56.

    If I saw a Higgens 46C, I would not hesitate to pick it up.
     
    Last edited: Sep 6, 2015
  6. SHOOTER13

    SHOOTER13 RETIRED MODERATOR Lifetime Supporting

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    Well Soccernut....PICS MAN PICS !!!
     
  7. Soccernut

    Soccernut Member

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    I quickly realized that after ejecting the last shell, the firing pin is pulled back into the firing position and if you don't dry fire it will get stored that way. So I am loading in a snap cap when I am done shooting and pulling the trigger to release the spring. Leaving the snap cap in until ready to shoot again.

    Here is a picture as requested. It has a period correct Sears Ted Williams 4x scope and Marlin sling.
     

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  8. MattNH

    MattNH Well-Known Member

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    Soccernut,

    Beautiful rifle. For my own education, is the top of the receiver grooved to accept the scope rings? From the picture, It appears to be and aluminum receiver, but I can't really tell. Can you take a picture of the back of the receiver, more of the top looking down?

    Thanks - Matt
     
  9. Soccernut

    Soccernut Member

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    The receiver is grooved for scope mounting and is round not squared off where it meets the stock so it should be the aluminum version. The barrel is stamped EG
     

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    Last edited: Sep 15, 2015
  10. MattNH

    MattNH Well-Known Member

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    Thank you!