Marlin model 1893

Discussion in 'Lever Action' started by TINCANBANDIT, Sep 15, 2015.

  1. TINCANBANDIT

    TINCANBANDIT Active Member

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    I have a gun that was made in or around 1916, it has the model 1893 designation (as opposed to the later model 93) and a "C" prefix on the serial number.
    In addition it has what appears to be an import stamp from Century Arms International (CAI STABLVT).

    Did Marlin send any model 1893s to Europe during WWI? Do I have a potential WWI surplus lever action?
     
  2. TINCANBANDIT

    TINCANBANDIT Active Member

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    anyone?.....................
     

  3. greyhawk50

    greyhawk50 Well-Known Member

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    I'm not ignoring your post. I just don't have a clue.
    I'm old but I wasn't around for WW1.
    Sure would like to see a pix of your 1893 Marlin.
     
  4. TINCANBANDIT

    TINCANBANDIT Active Member

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    Here are the pictures, some one has already replaced the wood

    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]

    and the dreaded CAI stamp

    [​IMG]
     
  5. ElVaquero

    ElVaquero Member

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    How long is the barrel, and what caliber is it?
     
  6. mm93

    mm93 Well-Known Member

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    No Marlin did not send any lever action rifles to Europe for the WWI effort. It most likely was either sent for private sale, or someone took it along on a move to Europe.
    Most guns entering Europe would have been sent to a proof house, and been proof tested before they could be owned or used there. I would expect your gun to have various proof marks on the barrel, which can determine where and approximately when it was there.
     
  7. TINCANBANDIT

    TINCANBANDIT Active Member

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  8. mm93

    mm93 Well-Known Member

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    Nothing wrong with restoring it IF you plan on doing a correct restoration. That means rust bluing the barrel and mag tube, correct caseharden colors on the receiver, lever, hammer, forearm cap, and buttplate. Those stocks are beyond saving, as the inletting to the tangs is already too wide, and filling the gaps will only deter from the look of the gun; ruining a decent restoration.
    Hopefully the bore is excellent, as restoring the rest, and not having a good bore is also a waste of money. With the heavy pitting on the outside, it might prove to be a real challenge to polish out the pitting, and not lose all the original rollstamp markings. If they go away, the restoration will also fail, unless you pay to have them redone. Might be better to find a nice donor barrel, and sell this one to someone else.
    By the time you get it done, and done correctly, you usually can sell what you have, and use the same funds for restoration, to buy a much nicer gun, that's not restored. Most restorations that require total redo, cost more than the gun is worth when we're done. At least if they're done correct!
     
  9. PAHunter

    PAHunter Active Member

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    Restoration

    Hi TCB:

    MM93 is hitting the nail RIGHT on top of the head. Restorations can be very costly and some times they monetarily are just not worth it.

    I have paid for some restorations, but they were my own rifles or shotguns that I had since I was a kid. And believe me that was a LONG, LONG time ago.;)

    But it was worth it to me because of the sentimental value that went with the firearms.

    Regards PAH
     
  10. msharley

    msharley Well-Known Member

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    Hey Tin Can,

    Swell looking 1893.

    Like the other fellows said, restore it in "good taste".

    Or, just SHOOT IT!! :D

    Later, Mark
     
  11. TINCANBANDIT

    TINCANBANDIT Active Member

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    Anyone have a magazine tube and/or barrel for one of these guns? 30-30, 26" long barrel, 25 3/16" magazine tube.
     
  12. TINCANBANDIT

    TINCANBANDIT Active Member

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    BTW the gun appears to have been nickel plated at one point, was that an option in 1913-1920 era? or was this an aftermarket finish?
     
  13. mm93

    mm93 Well-Known Member

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    Yes, nickel was an option, but without seeing your gun I couldn't determine if yours is factory or one of many that was plated later.
    Contact Redman's Barrel Liners for the mag tube. Randy builds them and has a great stock.
     
  14. Gumpy

    Gumpy AKA Richard Prestage

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    Thanks for that information!
     
  15. FordTruck

    FordTruck Well-Known Member

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    A good reference material is: :Marlin Firearms: A History Of The Guns And The Company That Made Them by Lt. Col Wm. S. Brophy, U.S. Army Ret. I checked it out at my public library to learn a little more about their Model 1894 and Model 62 Levermatic in .30 Carbine.
     
  16. mm93

    mm93 Well-Known Member

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    Bill's book is a wonderful reference for Marlins and their history! He finished it not long before his death, and we as Marlin collectors are fortunate to have such a fine reference! It brought old Marlins to the attention of many gun guys who previously considered them 2nd class to Winchesters. Unfortunately that also created a huge price jump in the values of old Marlins too!
     
  17. teaberryeagle

    teaberryeagle Well-Known Member

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    The action on yours looks almost exactly like mine....also a Model 1893...mine is caliber 25-36, but I shot the Winchester 25-35 shells, with a hex barrel....just thought you might enjoy seeing another similar to yours....here's some of my photos.
     
  18. teaberryeagle

    teaberryeagle Well-Known Member

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    In my comment above I mistakenly noted it has a hex barrel....should have said octagon barrel.
     
  19. TINCANBANDIT

    TINCANBANDIT Active Member

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    Wow, beautiful gun, and it great shape too!