Neck vs Fullsize

Discussion in 'Ammo & Reloading' started by oldbrass, Mar 20, 2013.

  1. oldbrass

    oldbrass Well-Known Member

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    Hope someone can chime in here, can you get more brass life by just neck sizing ? I`ve searched it on the web and got a thousand different answers.
    I`ve took measurements of my brass before and after firing and there`s just a few thousands difference on the case size. I`m just pondering this question incase brass gets even more scarce..

    apoligies in advance if this has been beat to death here...

    O.B.
     
  2. Hyphenated

    Hyphenated Well-Known Member

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    My unprofessional experience is....neck sizing extends case life. Assuming you are using all the cases in the same firearm there is a benefit. Brass becomes brittle as it is work hardened. Once your case has been fired it will expand to fill the chamber. No need to re-size the whole case, it will fit back into the same chamber. The only reason you need to neck size is to provide tension to hold the bullet in place. If it wasn't for the neck tension issue the case could be used over again "as is".

    If you have more than one firearm in the same caliber you will have to keep your brass segregated if you go the neck size only route. I recently tested this theory because I have more than one .30-30win. (Image that!!) There was enough difference in chamber dimensions between rifles that, some cases required extra effort and some wouldn't chamber at all.

    Soooo...if you have the luxury of having enough brass to designate a batch for each rifle I would go the neck sizing route. The less you work it the longer it lasts.
     
    Last edited: Mar 20, 2013

  3. oldbrass

    oldbrass Well-Known Member

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    Thanx, I have only one each of all my calibers...:eek:
     
  4. greyhawk50

    greyhawk50 Well-Known Member

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    I believe that neck sizing increases case life. True or false??? Like you say, opinions vary.
    However, I believe that there is another advantage to neck sizing that re-loaders overlook. The case is fire formed to match your specific rifle. Neck sizing allows the bullet to be centered with the bore therefore (in theory) improving accuracy.
    Full length sizing reduces the overall case size and allows it to "rest" at the bottom of the chamber. Therefore, the bullet is miss-aligned with the bore.
    Don't know that this has ever been proven but there must be some reason why Bench Rest Shooters only neck size.
     
  5. oldbrass

    oldbrass Well-Known Member

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    That makes sence..I`ve never been a bench shooter but I`ve shot many a beer can..
     
  6. Bucky

    Bucky Well-Known Member

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    Hyphenated
    You are correct in saying brass becomes brittle, and the easiest way to accertain this, (from what I have been told) is splitting of the neck of the case.
    Also rotation of the cases becomes a real factor in extending the life of the group of cases too ie, if you have 200 cases, then re-load in groups of 50, and when "spent", put them at the back of the que, and reload a different group. ( hope I have explained that correctly)
    You can anneel them by simply standing the case in water, up to the shoulder, and with a blow torch or something similar, heat the neck till it gets a dull glow, and then simply tip them over into the water.

    Cgeers
    Bucky
     
    Last edited: Mar 21, 2013
  7. FOUR4D4

    FOUR4D4 Moderator Moderator

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    Not meaning to jump this thread. but dont a necked brass have less of a life like say a straight jacked round? meaning less of the times it can be reloaded.Excuse my grammer.
     
  8. oldbrass

    oldbrass Well-Known Member

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    I beleave your refering to Bottle neck VS straitwall case, I have no idea LOL.
    I reload pull the trigger and gun go boom..sometimes I hit something:eek:
     
  9. Bucky

    Bucky Well-Known Member

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    Buggered if I can answer that Mate !
    All I know is that I have had both split, sometimes during reloading, and other times after a shot.

    :D
    Cheers
    Bucky
     
  10. tahoe2

    tahoe2 Well-Known Member

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    I full length size & trim to length the first loading, neck size for 3 or 4 loadings then anneal the cases and start the process again.
    I have used some cases up to 14 times, but they usually last 8-12 before splits start, I usually do batches of 50 for bottle-neck cases and
    always full length size straight walled cases (38-55 & 375 winchester).
     
  11. greyhawk50

    greyhawk50 Well-Known Member

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    Let me amend my previous post #4.
    I believe that full length sizing is required for cases that are to be used in Lever & Pump Guns.
    Lever & Pump Guns lack the mechanical force of a Bolt Gun therefore chambering problems can occur if the case is neck sized.
    JMHO
     
  12. R.Ph. 380

    R.Ph. 380 Well-Known Member

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    If you really want to extend the life of your cases, They should be annealed at least after every 3 firing. I have some 308 cases that are on their 8th reloading. I haven't used the 300 AAC BLK enough yet, but I don't want to have to make anymore cases than necessary, sooooooooo, I will studiously anneal my cases after every 3 firing. Takes only small amount of time, I've invested in a good annealing rig and Propane's relatively cheap. What's not to like?

    Bill
     
  13. oldbrass

    oldbrass Well-Known Member

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    I`ve never annealed cases..How exactly do you do it ??
     
  14. tahoe2

    tahoe2 Well-Known Member

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    youtube, then pick your poison
     
  15. Spoon

    Spoon Well-Known Member

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    I agree Tahoe, getting them heated is key. Annealing is a PIA that pays dividends whether FL or neck sized only. Heat Treating is almost a critically-needed step with supplies down and prices what they are.
     
  16. tahoe2

    tahoe2 Well-Known Member

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    I will amend my postings somewhat, I have three 8mm's and two 7mm's, (all x57's) so I have to keep track of which rifle the ammo is going in, I take the most care for the hunting ammo, the plinking ammo not so much, but I still try to get the most life out of my brass regardless. If I know I'm going to be shooting multiple guns in the same caliber in the same outing, I will just full length size and call it good. But I do try to tailor ammo to each one individually. I guess that officially qualifies me as a "gun nut" !! LOL :D
     
    Last edited: Apr 10, 2013
  17. FordTruck

    FordTruck Well-Known Member

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    I'd trim my .357 brass with splits down to .38 Spl. length & continue using them until they split again then trim down to .38 Long Colt length & continue using them until they split again & trim down to .38 Short Colt length & continue using them until they split again when I'd put 'em in the scrap bucket to sell.
     
  18. oldbrass

    oldbrass Well-Known Member

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    I have annealed my 30-30 brass, it was easy, put the brass in a socket spun by a drill, get it blue and drop in water..