Reloading Manuals

Discussion in 'Ammo & Reloading' started by FOUR4D4, Jul 24, 2012.

  1. FOUR4D4

    FOUR4D4 Moderator Moderator

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    Whats your most informative reloading manual you own? One thats good for beginers I have two Sierra 5th edition manual & Lymans 48th.The Lee Modern Reloading Manual - 2nd Edition i have heard is a good manual
     
  2. duster066

    duster066 Well-Known Member Supporting

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    I only have one, and have found it all I need. It's the Lyman Cast Bullet Handbook, and it has all the relevant reloading and ballistics data as well as the casting information. I supplement it for jacketed rounds with internet data.
     

  3. greyhawk50

    greyhawk50 Well-Known Member

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    Been loading for 40+ years and have accumulated several Manuals & Booklets.
    Most of my information comes from the Hodgdon Reloading Data Center that is On-Line.
    http://data.hodgdon.com/main_menu.asp
    As for hardbound manuals, I feel that they should be updated every few years because things change. Don't ask me why or what??
    I have found notable variants from one manual to another, of different suppliers and sometimes the same supplier. :confused:
    My #1 go-to manual is the Hornady 7 th. Edition. Also have the Hornady 3 rd. Edition.
    I have a Speer #13 but I don't trust it. :mad:
    Also have several Lyman Manuals, the latest being the 49 th. Edition. Also have the 45 th., 43 rd., and an older one without a front or back cover. All very handy for reference. I've heard very good reviews on the Lyman, especially from those that cast their own bullets. :D
    Sometimes, different powder company's give out Booklets. I have some from Accurate, Winchester, Hodgdon, DuPont & IMR.

    Grey
     
  4. FOUR4D4

    FOUR4D4 Moderator Moderator

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    Im sorry about all the questions lately on reloading
     
  5. greyhawk50

    greyhawk50 Well-Known Member

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    It's not a problem. I for one enjoy helping where I can. :D I'm sure that others feel the same way. After all, we're a friendly bunch around here. ;)
     
  6. squirrelhunter

    squirrelhunter Well-Known Member Lifetime Supporting

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    My #1 go to manual is Hornady 6th edition.I've got a few more but that's the one I go to first.
     
  7. axxe55

    axxe55 Well-Known Member

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    the best load data manual for a beginning reloader is Lee's Modern Reloading manual. they go into a lot of detail in the first part of the book showing all the steps and go into quite a bit of detail on the reloading process. i also use the Nosler data books. they are quit good too. Sierra data book is another i use.

    if beginning, get the book, The ABC's of Reloading. very good book on the process of reloading and tells you what equipment you need to get started, also will help you set up an area to reload in. goes over a lot of the safety procedures that are essential to reloading. very good book and can be found at Amazon.com usually for $15 or less.
     
  8. Hyphenated

    Hyphenated Well-Known Member

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    Reloading manuals are like Lay's potato chips....you can't just have one. The very minimum is one in each bathroom and one on your bench. :D
     
  9. Rooster59

    Rooster59 Well-Known Member

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    I have the Lee 2nd Edition and Lyman 48th. The Lee served as my 1st grade reloading primer textbook. It is very imformative and seems to take a basic through highly technical approach for most subjects. Really gives a lot of insight to reloading and the impact each step and component has.

    The most used is the Lyman 48th. I think it has more detail of load ranges, bullets used, and background on the cartridge compared to Lee. Lee is somewhat universal in it's description of bullets used. The Lee serves as a reference to the Lyman to insure I'm not going to work up a load that has errors in the data.

    I have some free manuals with limited data from the powder manufacturers picked up at the NRA conventions when they were in St Louis. Those are good reference material but not good enough for full blown reloading work.

    Otherwise, some fellow forum members have been generous enough to provide excerpts from manuals I don't have when I'd like to experiment on a load that the other two don't cover based on bullet selection, powder choice, etc. There really is a lot of range in each manual as to what they include and don't include.
     
  10. Rooster59

    Rooster59 Well-Known Member

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    And one near the whelping box?
     
  11. Big bore

    Big bore Active Member

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    I have the current Lyman manual, 49th edition & an older 46th edition. The 49th is my favorite. Plenty of data, both cast and jacketed.
     
  12. aka

    aka Well-Known Member

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    Rooster do you read to the pups?

    My manual is so old that the stone it carved in is starting to crumble. Hornaday VolII 1975. I use the heck out of the Hodgdon site. I have also started a 3 ring binder for my own use. It is amazing how quck it filled up but is handy at the loading bench.
     
  13. Rooster59

    Rooster59 Well-Known Member

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    No but Hyph might!
     
  14. Hyphenated

    Hyphenated Well-Known Member

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    No 'might' about it.
     
  15. Badpe48

    Badpe48 Active Member

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    Question for Greyhawk

    Greyhawk,
    Just wondering. Why don't you trust the Speer Reloading manual#13? I've been reloading for over 30 years and have found the Speer manuals to be very helpful in working up loads using Speer bullets. I have used Speer Manuals #9,11, &12. I now have the Speer Manual#14. I also have Hornady Manuals #8&9 for their bullets. I've loaded mainly 357Mag. 308Win. 30-30Win. and have just started reloading 9MM.
    No problem. I was just wondering what problems you might have had.
     
  16. greyhawk50

    greyhawk50 Well-Known Member

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    Badpe48;
    As I get older, my forgetter keeps getting better.
    I drifted away from the Speer Manual many years ago. Don't remember exactly why. As I recall, I found a couple of their max loads to be too hot. They only list loads for their bullets. For example, they don't list a load for the 200 gr. bullet in a .35 Rem. (only the 180 gr. & the 220 gr.)
    Originally, I bought the Speer Manual because I needed loads for a 700 BDL Remington 6mm-284 that I owned many years ago. Very few manuals list that cartridge.

    My thoughts are to compare data from more than one manual, select a start load and proceed from there until I get what I want w/o exceeding the max. recommended. I found the Speer to be "out of step" as compared with other manuals. The worst case was an IMR 3031 load for the 6mm-284 that separated the case head from the body. The other was a 7.7 Jpn. that was too hot.
    Loading Manuals are used as a reference for load development. For over 40 years, I was careful to follow only what was listed in a manual. I would also start low and work up to max performance/accuracy. The information given in the manuals is designed to stay on the conservative side of a safe load. Even my Hornady 3rd. & 7th. Editions list different loads for the same caliber-cartridge. Go figure??

    My hunting rifles have always been for hunting so I push the upper limits. I practice with the same loads that I use for hunting. The firearms that are for fun at the range are loaded more on the conservative side.

    If the Speer Manual is working for you and the calibers that you load, by all means, stay with it.
    It's just a personal preference thing based on my experience.

    Grey
     
    Last edited: Dec 31, 2012
  17. Badpe48

    Badpe48 Active Member

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    Thanks Grey

    Thanks Grey.

    I have used Speer manuals with only Speer Bullets.
    I've noticed that as new versions of all manuals are printed, the maximum loads have all gone down in powder amounts. This has been the case with both Speer and Hornady Manuals. So far, these are the only manuals I've used. Up till the present time, I haven't had any problems. I usually keep my max loads just below the recomended maximums.
    Each of us has our own methods of reloading and as you say... As long as it works... that's fine.

    Take care and Happy New Year
    Pete
     
  18. R.Ph. 380

    R.Ph. 380 Well-Known Member

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    I believe thae very minimum is 3. Of these, one has to be Lee Modern Reloading 2nd edition, The Lyman and then your choice of the Hornady, Speer, and the internet. My major thrust is you must check one against the other to determine where each falls down and actually gives bad advice(it does happen).

    Bill
     
  19. Bucky

    Bucky Well-Known Member

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    I have a Speer #13, and ADI's "Handlloader's manual
    I also get on line and check out the ADI Powder Handloader's Giude ( who own Hodgson's anyway ) for any current changes.
     
  20. greyhawk50

    greyhawk50 Well-Known Member

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    http://www.hodgdon.com/index.html