Roofing hatchet

Discussion in 'Other Weapons' started by MattNH, Feb 15, 2015.

  1. MattNH

    MattNH Well-Known Member

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    This is more of a tool not really a "weapon" but seems to fit this category. My 11 year old son found a an old rusted and abused roofing hatchet head in my father-in-law, his grandfather's, garage while we we over watching the Super Bowl. He brought it home and I gave him an old hickory splitting maul handle I broke. He cut it down to the length he wanted, stained it and sealed it with Tung Oil. I helped cut down the top to fit the head. He sanded it down to fit, I showed him how to use a coping saw to cut an eye for a wedge. I did the initial grinding to restore the edge but he finished it up and sharpened it. He's very proud of it.

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  2. hombre243

    hombre243 Well-Known Member

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    My family has had one just like this in our family for about 200 years. It has had 4 new heads and 6 new handles but is still in fine shape today.:D
     

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    Last edited: Feb 15, 2015

  3. Nogoat

    Nogoat Well-Known Member

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    Have one too, didn't know that was the purpose.
     
  4. hombre243

    hombre243 Well-Known Member

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    The notch...that is for pulling and bending nails? My dad had one too.
     
  5. MattNH

    MattNH Well-Known Member

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    My understanding is the hatchet part is for splitting the shakes, the hammer head is obvious and the notch is the nail puller.
     
  6. hombre243

    hombre243 Well-Known Member

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    My Dad used to make us these little flat arrows made from wood shakes. I always wondered how he got so good with that hatchet. He would whittle out about 10 arrows and a 18" long stick and then he would tie a string to the stick. We would fling the arrows up in the air and see how long it would take for them to come down. Great fun.

    I didn't know that his hatchet was a roofing ax/whatever. But he was a farm kid and I would not doubt he got good at makin shingles when they built barns on the farm.

    Thanks for the input...makes a lot of sense now.