Segregating Brass

Discussion in 'Ammo & Reloading' started by Rooster59, Jul 26, 2012.

  1. Rooster59

    Rooster59 Well-Known Member

    176
    0
    I dumped a mixed lot of used brass from various calibers and load testing into the tumbler this morning in a fit of cleaning off the reloading bench. I wasn't about to seperate them by how many times they've been loaded, etc.

    Does everyone meticulously seperate brass by number of loadings?

    For reference I load 45-70 (trap door levels), 357 (plinkers to mid-upper levels, 38spl (light target loads for wife's 2" S&W), and 45LC at upper 14,000 levels (no John Taffin stuff). I typically inspect brass closely after tumbling when depriming, resizing, crimping, and final inspection. Is there any real pressing reason to keep the used brass seperate other than from the new brass with the load levels and inspection process I go through?

    Seems like all the record keeping and seperating based on number of times loaded is a waste unless I was pushing the pressure envelope all the time.
     
  2. greyhawk50

    greyhawk50 Well-Known Member

    1,970
    0
    I agree completely. Visual check confirms that it is either good or no good. Enough said.
    In all my years, I have never documented how many time a case has been loaded. And I practice with the same loads that I hunt with. Although, that might change if the price of components keep going up. Being retired, I don't have the cash flow that I once had.
     

  3. FOUR4D4

    FOUR4D4 Moderator Moderator

    7,886
    63
    I just bought some 444 brass i have no idea how many times it has been fired :eek:
    There are so many different aspects to reloading.
     
    Last edited: Jul 26, 2012
  4. Hyphenated

    Hyphenated Well-Known Member

    854
    0
    Deep in the bowels of you life insurance policy somewhere around page 18, paragraph 3, section C, it states "sky diving and not separating your brass", are reasons for cancellation. But hey...other than that I don't see a reason to kept track of number of firings. Your brass will tell you when it's had enough, usually splits in the case mouth during the flaring stage show first. Do visually check about a quarter of the way up from the base for signs of 'ringing'. That is usually a sign incipient case separation is in your future. You can check the inside of the case with a bent paper clip for severity.
     
  5. R.Ph. 380

    R.Ph. 380 Well-Known Member

    78
    0
    Rifle Only

    My 30-30 and my 308 are segregated by number of reloadings. I have about 300 Lapua 308 that were Canadian Military(now there's an oxymoron) They are reloaded 3 times and annealed before further use. They're on their 5th reloading now and I think I'll be aboe to get many loadings out of them. .223 and 5.56 are reloaded and relegated to the stockpile. I want 2000 per AR, loaded and set in magazines in the BOB.

    Pistol brass, not so much. I inspect them as I'm priming and reject any with indications of cracks, excessive dents, etc...45, 380, and 9mm

    Bill
     
  6. aka

    aka Well-Known Member

    254
    0
    I use to. Then I started noticing I had to many containers of brass on the bench. The brass gods get big portion of my .40 and 45acp so I am constantly looking for replacement. The others I inspect and reinspect as I am cleaning sizing and loading.. I have a coffee can for culls under the bench
     
  7. duster066

    duster066 Well-Known Member Supporting

    492
    0
    I did when I started, but range pick up got mixed in and at some point there was no accounting for what was what so I stopped. My dad sent me about a thousand 38 he srounge from his police range back in the 70s. Most of those have been run through a worn out non carbide die or dies and have longitudinal scratch on them. I use them for light plinkers and lose on or two every now and then. There is no telling how many times they have been shot. I have some 357 and 44m that I received with unknown load counts except they were high. They just keep on shooting and I sometimes load them hot. I'll likely never buy 45acp brass again. I loose a couple of pieces to the grass every time I shoot, but I find many many more than I came with. If I didn't trade off the 9mm pickup I'd be up to my knees in that stuff.:)
     
  8. axxe55

    axxe55 Well-Known Member

    1,241
    0
    i use to sort mine, but not so much anymore. i usually sort them after tumbling, but that's because i sometimes tumble different caliber at the same time.
     
  9. Windy

    Windy Well-Known Member Supporting

    459
    0

    What do you do with the culls? I pick up brass whenever I go shooting. I have quite a bit of spent brass. I might start a contest and offer my brass as the prize but I was also thinking of recycling it. Is there a market for that?
     
  10. aka

    aka Well-Known Member

    254
    0
    just scrap brass weight is not paying a great deal. I've made buttons and such out of the bases. Powder dippers. But mostly it's just scrap
     
  11. Rooster59

    Rooster59 Well-Known Member

    176
    0
    All the comments were kind of what I thought. Some do very intense record-keeping and pitch them on a predetermined cycle, and many do as I do.

    Thanks for the "ringing" tip. I haven't read much if anything on that. Can I check the ringing in my ears with a paperclip too? :D
     
  12. Hyphenated

    Hyphenated Well-Known Member

    854
    0
    That's Funny.....try a tuning fork so you get the ringing at the right pitch.:rolleyes:
     
  13. duster066

    duster066 Well-Known Member Supporting

    492
    0
    I trade mine, mostly to other forum members. About a month ago I traded most of my 9mm for a bag of semi-precious stones. Here are six of the thirty or so right here.
    [​IMG]