The 35/30-30 goes to the range

Discussion in 'Lever Action' started by Hyphenated, Dec 1, 2012.

  1. Hyphenated

    Hyphenated Well-Known Member

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    My 35/30-30 got it's first chance to shoot real ammo Friday morning. It was warm and very windy, but I didn't care. I just wanted to get my first impressions of the rifle and break in the barrel a little.

    I had the rifle bore sighted before I left the house so I knew it would be on the paper at 25yds. I just didn't know where. I started shooting at the left target in the pictures below. I was using a six o'clock hold on the green squares. The first shot was perfect for elevation and just a smidgen left. On the second shot there were no new holes in the paper. I'll admit I was disappointed. I was shooting plinking loads...140gr JHP pistol bullets at maybe 1750fps. My first thought was it just doesn't like pistol bullets. Then I dialed the scope up to 9x for another look at the target. Dang! There might be two bullets making one big hole. So I fired three more and finished the 5 shot group. The results put a smile back on my face. I moved to the square on the right and fired another 5 shot group.

    I'm thinking I am going to like this rifle.
     

    Attached Files:

  2. SHOOTER13

    SHOOTER13 RETIRED MODERATOR Lifetime Supporting

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    Awesome groupings Hyphenated !!
     

  3. Rich1028

    Rich1028 Well-Known Member

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    nice!!!

    10 characters.
     
  4. greyhawk50

    greyhawk50 Well-Known Member

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    Most excellent. You gotta like that.
    Thanks for the report. We like pics.
     
  5. FOUR4D4

    FOUR4D4 Moderator Moderator

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  6. jcw

    jcw Member

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    Very nice! Following this with much interest. A few questions on the brass. How thin are the necks after fire forming? When do split necks start showing up? Are you annealing the brass?
     
  7. Hyphenated

    Hyphenated Well-Known Member

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    jcw...I am not annealing the brass. It is no thinner than regular 30-30 cases, well maybe a smidgen. After I fire form the brass it needs to be trimmed back several thousand to fit the chamber. The thinnest part of the brass is removed at that time. Since this was the first time actual bullets have gone down range the brass has only been fired once. From my experience with my two 38-55's, which is the same procedure making brass, the cases last quite a while. You just have to be conservative with neck flaring during reloading. Most of them will go 6 to 8 times, but of course I am using mid-power cast bullets. If I lose a few along the way it's not a big issue. Thurdy-thurdy cases are still pretty cheap compared to most rifle brass.:)
     
    Last edited: Dec 3, 2012
  8. Badpe48

    Badpe48 Active Member

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    Great shooting.. I think you are going to love that rifle. :D
     
  9. SWO1

    SWO1 Well-Known Member Lifetime Supporting

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    Now you're talkin....or should I say Shootin. Got to add that 35/30-30 to your signiture now....at the top....:D
     
  10. jcw

    jcw Member

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    Hyphenated, Thanks for the info. You've got yourself a very interesting project. Looking forward to seeing it progress.
     
  11. hunter5567

    hunter5567 Well-Known Member

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    Did you get Jesse Ocumpaugh to do the rebore on your rifle and does he rechamber dies for it also? I thought about having a rifle rebored to 356 win.
    if I can find a rifle with endcap to do the conversion.
     
  12. Hyphenated

    Hyphenated Well-Known Member

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    Hunter...yes Jesse did the re-bore on this rifle. I do not know if he will make dies. I am having someone else trim a .35rem die set for me to use on the .35/30-30.

    I know Jesse does the .356win conversion. If you go that route you won't need custom dies made they are still available, but maybe only as a seasonal item by Lyman or RCBS.

    Edit Add: You could also use .358win dies if you couldn't find any 'real' .356win dies.
     
    Last edited: Dec 4, 2012
  13. Plumber

    Plumber Well-Known Member

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    Hyphenated,
    I think the 358 and 356 dies are the same. Only the shell holder is different. The 356 takes the same shell holder as the 30-30.
     
  14. Hyphenated

    Hyphenated Well-Known Member

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    You are absolutely right Plumber. I only brought it up because not everyone knows they are the same cartridge with the exception of the rim. I might add it is an excellent round for anybody looking to convert a .30-30 to increase your rifles capabilities. However, with full power loads, your mild mannered .30-30 is no longer mild. :eek: :D
     
  15. Plumber

    Plumber Well-Known Member

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    I was very lucky to get a 336 ER, NOS barrel, and had my gun smith install it on a 336 SC for me.
     
  16. hunter5567

    hunter5567 Well-Known Member

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    Ya, I've had a Winnie 356 in the past and a Ruger 358 bolt action rifle.
    I'm currently loading Super 35 remington loads in my H&R Handirifle .35 Rem.
    You can push a 200gr bullet at 2400fps which is basically a little more than what the factory 356 ammo did in the lever guns and use a pointed bullet to boot.
    The FTX bullets can be used in the levers though and work great in the 35's.
    RCBS probably still can make 35/30 dies but are probably expensive due to lack of interest. Of course just getting a Marlin in 35 Rem would make it a lot easier but not as interesting. You should be able to push the 200gr bullets to 2200fps in the Marlin 35 and probably the 35/30 if desired.
    The 35 rem is a strong case only limited as to the strength of the firearm it is fired in. There is a 35 Safar leveri rifle project going on that has been tested with 250gr bullets to 2500fps in 35 Rem brass using a proprietary Safari modification to a Marlin lever action. Thats 35 Whelen or 350 Rem Mag territory.
     
  17. Hyphenated

    Hyphenated Well-Known Member

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    Yes for those reloaders with some experience behind them the .35Rem can really be given a boost. The .35-30, which is almost a straight case, will come in on the heels of the .375Win. if pushed a little.
    One of the biggest myths in reloading is the "weak case" argument. The .45colt's case is too weak or the .30-30 case is too thin. The case doesn't hold pressure the firearm does. The cartridge case is simply an envelope to hold the powder and bullet until fired. All of the lower pressure cartridges on the market today are held to those levels in deference to the 100 year old firearms still floating around. The .45colt is the perfect example. Loaded to 36,000cup it will take apart an original 1873 revolver pretty darn quick, but you could shoot it forever in a Ruger BH or Contender no problem. So it is obvious the strength of the action is at fault and not the brass case causing the failure.
    I am certainly not suggesting that everyone should start "hot rodding" their .35Rem rifle or any other gun for that matter. But I do know with a little common sense there is room for improvement with the older cartridges in modern firearms.
    BTW...I am familiar with Flat Top's 35Rem Safari Grade rifles. We have conversed on that subject and others on several occasions. I gave him the measurements of the 245gr cast bullet I will be using in my .35-30 as the starting point for his heavyweight bullet. He has the tools and experience to make that project a success. I will not be trying to duplicate his velocities in my project.
     
  18. Plumber

    Plumber Well-Known Member

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    Hyphenated,
    I don't understand why all the reloading manuals keep perpetuating the myth of the 30-30 case being the reason for the low CUP of that round.
    What could be their motive?
     
  19. Hyphenated

    Hyphenated Well-Known Member

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    I don't know what's behind their motives. I guess you would have to ask them that question. I have my theories.

    Why does the .45colt get two sections in reloading manuals with two sets of pressure levels and not the .35Rem? The .35Rem is loaded in the Contender, but all the manuals use the same pressure as they use in the Marlin 336. For all the talk about how strong the .35Rem case is and how weak the .45colt cases are wouldn't you think it would be the other way around. The Contender is routinely loaded to 52,000cup. What do you think is holding the factories back from publishing Contender specific data for the .35Rem and .30-30Win??
     
  20. Plumber

    Plumber Well-Known Member

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    My loading manuals have three sets of pressure levels for the 45-70. Seems like the most popular rounds get the most coverage.
    Only my Speer manual has data for my 356 Win.