Trimming straight walled cases handgun and rifle

Discussion in 'Ammo & Reloading' started by FOUR4D4, Dec 3, 2015.

  1. FOUR4D4

    FOUR4D4 Moderator Moderator

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    I tried to post twice here and lost everything:mad:
     
  2. FOUR4D4

    FOUR4D4 Moderator Moderator

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    Here I will try for a 3rd time
    They say that straight walled cartridges do not have to trim the brass,is this true for rifle brass also.
    I'm curious because if the case is to long wont it cause to much pressure??:eek:
     

  3. SWO1

    SWO1 Well-Known Member Lifetime Supporting

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    Weather its pistol or rifle, straight walled or necked, the case length, in my opinion needs to be trimmed. Thats if you are trying to gain the most accuracy.

    A seating dye if set properly and consistant will seat the bullet the same and result in the same O.A.L.. The powder is not compressed as the case just sits further up the bearing body of the bullet. Bottle neck spaces off the shoulder of the case and straight wall spaces off the rim of the neck.

    I think pressure problems come with cases to SHORT not LONG. Now Im talking 1000th inch or so.

    I may be wrong .... I thought I was once but was mistaken ..... :D
     
  4. greyhawk50

    greyhawk50 Well-Known Member

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    I'll share my thoughts based on 47 years of loading.
    I have always checked or trimmer rifle and pistol cases based on the Load Manual Specifications. All Cases.

    However, early on, many years ago, I loaded 1000 rounds of 9X19 Luger. I had used a Lathe Type Case Length Trimmer. As it turned out, about 10% of them (100+) didn't fire because of a light primer strike. Apparently, the setting on the Trimmer had shifted and I had trimmed them a whisker too short. That was when I stopped loading 9mm and started buying new. The cost savings wasn't worth the headache. Also in recent years, I started using the Lee Case Length Trimmer System. Consistent results first time, every time. ;)

    Straight wall or bottle neck doesn't matter. If the case has a shoulder or a rim, case length is critical. The danger from high chamber pressure comes from the risk of the neck extending too far out of the dedicated chamber or into the rifling. Having even a fraction of the case neck between the bullet and the rifling is extremely hazardous.
    Having a fraction of extra space in the case is a moot point. The OAL (if properly set) has already determined the space (between the bullet's base and the base of the shell case) within the case regardless of the length of the neck. Follow my thoughts? And that space will vary anyway if you load a light bullet vs a heavier bullet. Always follow the AOL recommendations for the bullet being loaded. Always check the case length and trim accordingly.

    As for the origin of your question. "I believe".
    Only within the the past year or so have I heard anything about "not being concerned with case length". They were talking about semi-auto pistol cases and this only applies to Rimless, Straight Wall Cases like 380 auto, 9mm auto, 45 acp, etc. That is because those cartridges get their head space by seating on the mouth of the case (not the rim or shoulder). If your OAL is correct, the only danger would be to rupture at the rim of the case if it is protruding outside the chamber.

    I don't concern myself too much with rimless, straight wall semi-auto pistol cases. (my main concern is to not trim them too short) I do check from time to time to make sure they don't exceed the Max. Case length. This is seldom a problem unless you are shooting extra hot loads or your pistol's chamber is over size. With standard loads and a quality pistol, the case expansion & growth should be minimal.
    Everything else gets checked and held within specifications.

    I hope this helps.
     
    Last edited: Dec 4, 2015
  5. hombre243

    hombre243 Well-Known Member

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    Any case can use a good trimming from time to time. Measure it and if it is longer than it is supposed to be, trim it. Straight walled cases do not need to be trimmed as often as a shouldered case but they do need it occasionally.
     
  6. greyhawk50

    greyhawk50 Well-Known Member

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    I couldn't have said it better. I guess I just like the sound of my keyboard clicking. :eek:
     
  7. hombre243

    hombre243 Well-Known Member

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    I have been practicing saying what I need to say in as few words as possible. I have always been a talker and that is why I type so much. I went on vacation one time with the folks and talked so much about nothing that Dad made me ride on the roof of the car. He said it was because he forgot to bring the tie straps but I think he wanted me to hold on to the bags to keep them from falling off.

    (I could go on forever but like I said...I been practicing.:rolleyes:)
     
  8. squirrelhunter

    squirrelhunter Well-Known Member Lifetime Supporting

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    I use this system too and always check the length after I use it the first time if I'm doing a new caliber. After I got the stuff for .45acp I noticed it trimmed them about .10 below minimum so I had to shim between the Length Gauge and trimmer. Hopefully it was just an error for that 1 gauge and not that way on all they had made. I've got several others in different calibers and they're ok.
     
  9. FOUR4D4

    FOUR4D4 Moderator Moderator

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    I was going to start reloading but some unexpected things came up. Just in time for Christmas I need a few case prep tools.and would like to have a hand primer. I just haven't taken the step forward a set of check weights.might be a wise choice.and bullet puller.
    I was reading SW01 308 thread and it sparked an interest again on reloading
     
  10. hombre243

    hombre243 Well-Known Member

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    Attached Files:

    Last edited: Dec 4, 2015
  11. greyhawk50

    greyhawk50 Well-Known Member

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    I agree with checking the first shell of each new caliber. I have several caliber and so far, they are all spot on.
     
  12. FOUR4D4

    FOUR4D4 Moderator Moderator

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    The Lee Case Length Trimmer System seems like a pretty simple and straight forward.I was reading up on this and even I could understand how this works. thanks for the replies.
     
  13. hombre243

    hombre243 Well-Known Member

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    4etc, I reloaded for a 222 back in 1971-73 and then got out of it. I was doing just fine up until about 2007 and then a friend talked me into getting a Blackhawk in 45 LC. That's when the reloading re-started and I been feeding the urge ever since. I do not reload many calibers but all my centerfire rifles and pistols are spoon fed. The only factory loads I buy are for the emergency of when I need new brass and I do not want to wait for the brass to arrive UPS.

    Be thankful we are to prod you on and help keep you addicted, so we have more people to talk to about our hobby.:D
     
  14. FOUR4D4

    FOUR4D4 Moderator Moderator

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    Thankful to find mentors and this new, well not new but another useful resource we have as we know it the... internet.
    Back in 1971 you had books and mentors.I have three reloading books.One says they never saw the need to trim handgun brass but they make trimming for them just because people ask,Its the Lee book.
     
  15. hombre243

    hombre243 Well-Known Member

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    Back in 71 I has a Speer manual and a friend who said...get the dies. You can use my press. I left all my stuff with him...powder, primers and bullets, plus a 22 he was supposed to checker for me.

    He got fired and left town and took my stuff with him. I sold the 222 and didn't start reloading anything again until a few years ago. I'm havin fun now.
     
  16. FOUR4D4

    FOUR4D4 Moderator Moderator

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    That was rude of him,glad you decided to start reloading again




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