Articles from Editor

  1. Burglar Bear: 0, Homeowner with Marlin: 1

    When Victor Peters found a 400-pound black bear tearing through his sunroom in a search for food Wednesday night, the mild-mannered retired park ranger wanted things to work out amicably for both sides. However, when the bear decided otherwise, Peters had his Marlin 1895 there to help even the odds. A black bear, similar to this one, attacked a Florida man's home on two consecutive nights. Photo Wikipedia. The first break in The story began the day before when Peters, 64, of Lady Lake,...
  2. Cleaning and maintaining your rifles

    Marlin has long produced bolt-action rifles culminating with the MR-7 and later X7 series today as well as legacy semi-autos. However, keeping your rifle in tip-top condition is up to you. The primarily area of attacking the burnt carbon, metal shavings, and corrosive primer chemicals left behind by every range or field session is the barreled action. With a safe and unloaded weapon, with no brass or ammo around, remove your bolt and set it to the side. Next, use your cleaning rod in the...
  3. Enter the 177: Marlin Air Rifles

    When you think Marlin Firearms, you think just that-- firearms. Well it seems that there is also a Marlin-branded air rifle on the market today for those little shooters to enjoy as well. With that in mind, we look at the Marlin Cowboy. Marlin air guns? Over the past 130 years, Marlin has made a number of different items including shotguns, burp guns, machine guns, and handguns besides the standard list of .22 rifles, lever guns and bolt-action rigs. However, members ask about old Marlin...
  4. Forgotten perfection: The Marlin MR-7 bolt action rifle

    Marlin over the years has stepped up to the plate and provided an enduring series of bolt-action rifles over the past several decades. These guns all had two things in common: first, they were largely excellent designs. Second: their production run ended too soon. Perhaps none of their historic offerings hits these two points harder than the MR-7. Why the design? Known primarily for its semi-auto and lever-action rifles, Marlin has also dabbled in throw-bolt guns off and on as well. Back...
  5. Hey, that gun looks like a Marlin but it doesn't say so anywhere on it...

    Over the nearly two century long history of the company, Marlin has always made their own guns. In fact, for a good bit of the 20th Century, Marlin even made guns under different names for outfits like Montgomery Ward, C and C, and Western Auto, which were the precursors for the big box stores of today. These guns were given 'house' names when being sold at bargain basement prices, but deep down inside they are still Marlins. Marlin Model 336 right? Well, its actually a Glenfield Model 30A....
  6. How short can you get? The pre-1934 Marlin SBRs

    In the 1930s, the wise members of Congress passed legislation that established the National Firearms Act, which regulated the civilian use and ownership of all the cool guns such as those, capable of full-auto fire, cane guns, pen guns, silencers, and short-barreled rifles. It is this last class that caught up a number of innocent Marlin lever guns in the dragnet. A rare Chilean police-marked Model 94 Marlin saddle ring trapper in .44-40 (with a 900-yard ladder sight!) and a super short...
  7. How to Properly Pronounce 10 Gun Names You're Likely Saying Wrong (VIDEO)

    By default, if you are a member here (or just stopping by), odds are you are a dyed-in-the-wool Marlin fan. However, even you likely have had at least a few of the below pass through your hands at one time or another. There are few things more embarrassing for a new gun owner than mispronouncing the name of a firearm. It's even more embarrassing for a long-time gun owner. To help the gun owning public, our friends over at OutdoorHub put together this great video to lay out how to better...
  8. Keeping your Model 60 up and running

    The Marlin Model 60 tube-fed .22 semi-auto rifle is one of the most popular guns ever made. Between both the Marlin and Glenfield marked versions, there have been more than 11-million of these handy rimfires pushed out in the past half century. However, they do require a good bit of finesse to clean and maintain. As long as you can find the ammo for these bad boys today, these guns make great plinkers, but need to be maintained. (Photo: Marlin) Basic cleaning In all cleaning, make sure...
  9. Marlin 93: Classic collectable cowboy rifle

    In the tail end of the Old West, Marlin was still a new company. However, they were punching far out of their weight class with an innovative solid-framed lever action rifle in a variety of calibers for hunters, and homestead defenders alike. Today we simply remember it as the Model 93, and if you run across one for a good price, you are a lucky cowboy indeed. Why? When John M. Marlin hung his shingle out for the first time in 1870, he spent the first decade of the company's history making...
  10. Marlin is back, says Remington, promises a return to classic rifles with modern twist

    When Remington, under the aegis of the Freedom Group conglomerate of companies, gobbled up Marlin Firearms in 2007 for $41.7 million, then turned around and announced the long time factory in New Haven, Connecticut would be shuttered, many Marlin purists hung their head and muttered that the days of the classic company were over. Well, four years later, with a solid plan underway, Remington says that the Marlin brand isn't going anywhere and the old designs are coming back-- better than...
  11. Marlin Model 90: The New Haven Double Barrel

    With a company, that has a history now in its third decade; it shouldn't surprise anyone that Marlin has made everything from break-top revolvers, to machine guns for the military, to rifles in calibers from .17HMR to .458 Magnum. They have even made some shotguns to include a very nice boxlock double. (Although discontinued in 1959, the Marlin Model 90 can still make a great upland game piece. Photo from 16-gauge World) Design These guns came about in 1936 when Sears asked Marlin to...
  12. Marlin Peep Sights 101

    Aperture sights, often just called "peep sights" have been around on Marlin rifles both from the factory and as an aftermarket accessory for more than a century. These sights are, for many, the best alternative to optics and have proven themselves for generations in both target and hunting applications. What are they? Basically speaking, peep sights work through a theory called parallax suppression (for an excellent 23-page explanation of just what this is). The concept goes that the human...
  13. Marlin Rare Semi-Auto: The Open Bolt Marlin Model 50

    Odds are, you either cut your teeth on or have at least at one point in your life fired a Marlin semi-auto .22LR rifle. Today, the tube-fed Model 60 and its detachable-magazine Model 70 half-brother are the benchmark for rimfire auto-loaders around the world. Who would have thought that this all started in 84-years ago with the humble Model 50. Why was it born? Marlin, coming out of the "Roaring 20s" was a company looking to change. It had established itself with lever-action rifles and...
  14. Marlin releases new big loop 1895 GSBL in .45-70

    Those who are a fan of big-bore cowboy action rifles have long known of Marlin's 1895 series rifle. Take this gun and chop it down to make it a guide length carbine, give it a big-loop finger lever, make it stainless steel with a blackened FNC finish, and add a painted and laminated stock-- well that's the GSBL baby. A little history Marlin actually introduced their lever action rifles back in the 1880s with their classic Model 1895 made between 1895 (hence the name) and the entrance of...
  15. Marlin's 375 North Haven Big Bore

    For a few brief years in the Reagan-era, Marlin ponied up a lever-action hunting rifle that was among the pinnacle in hard-hitting big game guns of its kind. Based on the same 1895 action proven over the course of a century, the new gun used a very old round that had similarly been reinvented. What is the .375 Win? Back in the 1880s, one of the most effective "cowboy" rounds was the big-bore .38-55 Winchester. This black powder fueled cartridge could send a 255-grain bullet out a couple...
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