Articles from Editor

  1. Marlin's Turn of the Century pump: The Model 19 shotgun

    Produced for a scant two-year period, the often-overlooked Marlin Model 19 was a scattergun with class that signaled the end of 19th century thinking and stepped boldly towards a modern design that we can appreciate today. Bloodlines A superb Marlin 1898 shotgun Starting in 1898 Marlin made its first slide or trombone action shotgun, the imaginatively named Model 1898. This remained in production for almost a decade when it was replaced by the "teen series" (M16 and 17) guns which gave...
  2. Marlin Rare Semi-Auto: The Open Bolt Marlin Model 50

    Odds are, you either cut your teeth on or have at least at one point in your life fired a Marlin semi-auto .22LR rifle. Today, the tube-fed Model 60 and its detachable-magazine Model 70 half-brother are the benchmark for rimfire auto-loaders around the world. Who would have thought that this all started in 84-years ago with the humble Model 50. Why was it born? Marlin, coming out of the "Roaring 20s" was a company looking to change. It had established itself with lever-action rifles and...
  3. The shotgun that hits like a rifle: Marlin's 512 Slugmaster

    When the sabot slug hit the U.S. market in the late 1960s, it provided impetus for shotgun makers to design guns able to maximize the potential of these new rounds that could provide rifle-like accuracy out to a football field or more, effectively doubling the reach of the standard scattergun. This led to the Model 512. Marlin's flirtation with slug-guns Connecticut-based Marlin had been in the shotgun biz going all the way back to the 1890s. As the industry evolved so did the company,...
  4. When Marlin went big bore: The Original Super Goose

    For just a brief but glorious time, Marlin gave the masses of water fowlers what could be considered one of the most popular bolt-action large caliber shotguns of its day-- the 34-inch barreled Model 5510. And yes, the "10" is the size of the gauge. The bolt-action Marlin burners Today the Marlin Firearms Company is best known for its line of rimfire plinkers and lever-action hunting rifles, but they also made shotguns for nearly a solid century. Between 1903-1954 they produced no less...
  5. Marlin's compact triple four, the Model 444P Outfitter

    Marlin has long been the king of lever action rifles, and without a doubt the .444 Marlin has been one of the most popular heavy rounds of the last half century, which could mean that the briefly made Outfitter model with its abbreviated barrel is the compact king of the woods. The Design of the .444 Marlin Round Taking a fat, wide-necked 57mm long case (almost as long as a 7mm Mauser's); the Marlin Company mashed a .429" round on top to create a moose of a cartridge. It was longer by...
  6. Ultimate Marlin brush gun: The Model 62 Levermatic

    For a brief time in the 1960s, Marlin recast its vintage cowboy action rifle line into something a little more responsive and, using state of the art chamberings, was on the cutting edge of lever gun technology. Sadly, it wasn't to last. The Levermatic family Marlin firearms engineering guru Tom Robinson was issued patent number 2,823,480 Feb 18, 1956 for the Levermatic receiver, a system that he developed several years before from the Kessler Arms Company's "Lever-Matic" shotgun. What was...
  7. Forgotten perfection: The Marlin MR-7 bolt action rifle

    Marlin over the years has stepped up to the plate and provided an enduring series of bolt-action rifles over the past several decades. These guns all had two things in common: first, they were largely excellent designs. Second: their production run ended too soon. Perhaps none of their historic offerings hits these two points harder than the MR-7. Why the design? Known primarily for its semi-auto and lever-action rifles, Marlin has also dabbled in throw-bolt guns off and on as well. Back...
  8. The little known Marlin Model 200 crack barrel shotgun

    It a fit of growth before being acquired by Remington, in 2000 Marlin purchased the assets of H&R 1871, a Massachusetts-based firearms maker who had likewise made guns under the moniker of NEF for generations. This company, the largest manufacturer of single shot shotguns and rifles in the world, even made a Marlin branded shotgun for a brief period. Marlin's single shot background Known primarily for their rifles, Marlin Firearms of New Haven, Connecticut also sold a line of shotguns for...
  9. Marlin Model 90: The New Haven Double Barrel

    With a company, that has a history now in its third decade; it shouldn't surprise anyone that Marlin has made everything from break-top revolvers, to machine guns for the military, to rifles in calibers from .17HMR to .458 Magnum. They have even made some shotguns to include a very nice boxlock double. (Although discontinued in 1959, the Marlin Model 90 can still make a great upland game piece. Photo from 16-gauge World) Design These guns came about in 1936 when Sears asked Marlin to...
  10. Marlin's classic stock-tubed Models 88/98

    If you have been around Marlin rifles for a minute, you are used to tubular underbarrel mags, detachable box mags, and even single-shots. However a short-lived series of rimfire plinkers you may not be aware of also exist that load completely differently. The Marlin Model 98--note the side loading port in the buttstock You load it where? In the years after World War II, Marlin was looking to expand their offerings with some new blood. A popular rifle of the time was the Browning Semi-Auto...
  11. The Marauder: Marlin's short-barreled cowboy gun

    While no one ever accused the Marlin 30 series lever action rifle of being too long in the field, the company has from time to time flirted with chopping it down even further. One of the shortest of these was the briefly made 336 Marauder. Isn't it cute? The basic platform Way back in 1893 one LL Hepburn, a gunsmith at Marlin, was issued patent number 502,489 for a new locking bolt system with a two-piece firing pin and rectangular bolt that could be actuated by an under-rifle lever...
  12. Marlin's Faux 22 M1 Carbine, the Model 989M2

    Today the AR-15 series rifles are perhaps the most popular semi-auto firearms in the country. In the early 1960s, when the AR was still unknown, the go-to rifle for medium game hunting and home defense was the M1 Carbine. With this understood, Marlin went about creating a M1-ish carbine for small game hunters and plinkers. This gun we know today as the Model 989M2. Just what was the M1 anyway? Formally, the "United States Carbine, Caliber .30, M1," but commonly just referred to as the M1,...
  13. Marlin's 375 North Haven Big Bore

    For a few brief years in the Reagan-era, Marlin ponied up a lever-action hunting rifle that was among the pinnacle in hard-hitting big game guns of its kind. Based on the same 1895 action proven over the course of a century, the new gun used a very old round that had similarly been reinvented. What is the .375 Win? Back in the 1880s, one of the most effective "cowboy" rounds was the big-bore .38-55 Winchester. This black powder fueled cartridge could send a 255-grain bullet out a couple...
  14. You got target rifle in my small game gun! The tale of the Marlin 880SQ

    For a brief period in time, Marlin made a handy .22LR bolt action rifle that with a 7-shot detachable box mag that made a great little field gun. At the same time, they made a tack-driving benchrest rifle with a heavy target barrel. Well, someone at some point had the brilliant crackle of imagination to brainstorm what happened if they put the better of each one together. The 880 series An evolution of the company's Model 780 rifle, this 5.75-pound field, and tin can special used a very...
  15. One for the bring back list: The Marlin Midget Magnum

    Made in limited numbers for only a brief period, the rifle was designated the Model 25MB, but everyone knows this handy little take down carbine best as the Midget Magnum. Those who known it love it. Those who haven't probably will, and that's the problem because those that have them already aren't letting go. Origins In 1979, Marlin introduced a basic little bolt-action .22 with a 7-shot detachable single-stack box magazine and 22-inch barrel. This rifle, the Glenfield Model 25, was a...
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