Articles from Editor

  1. When Marlin went big bore: The Original Super Goose

    For just a brief but glorious time, Marlin gave the masses of water fowlers what could be considered one of the most popular bolt-action large caliber shotguns of its day-- the 34-inch barreled Model 5510. And yes, the "10" is the size of the gauge. The bolt-action Marlin burners Today the Marlin Firearms Company is best known for its line of rimfire plinkers and lever-action hunting rifles, but they also made shotguns for nearly a solid century. Between 1903-1954 they produced no less...
  2. Marlin's Long Tom 120 scattergun

    For well over a century JM Marlin's firearms company made a line of pump action shotguns that got little attention when compared to their much more popular rifle line that both began the company and endure today. Among this flock of rare birds included the super groovy Model 120 with its optional forty-inch (40 inch) barrel. That is not a misprint. Marlin's pump line Starting in 1898 Marlin made its first slide or trombone action shotgun, the imaginatively named Model 1898. This remained...
  3. The Screaming hot Marlin 336SC Zipper of yesteryear

    If you are a predator or varmint hunter, odds are the thought of a 50-ish grain .22 caliber bullet with a velocity of over 3200 feet per second would get your attention. Well the thing is, the round itself has existed for almost a century as the .219 Zipper and furthermore, there is a classic JM rifle that chambered it and it's considered one of the "holy grails" of modern Marlin lever guns. What is the Zip? As explained by Gun Digest's Dan Sheeler, the .219 Zipper was birthed out into the...
  4. Marlin's 375 North Haven Big Bore

    For a few brief years in the Reagan-era, Marlin ponied up a lever-action hunting rifle that was among the pinnacle in hard-hitting big game guns of its kind. Based on the same 1895 action proven over the course of a century, the new gun used a very old round that had similarly been reinvented. What is the .375 Win? Back in the 1880s, one of the most effective "cowboy" rounds was the big-bore .38-55 Winchester. This black powder fueled cartridge could send a 255-grain bullet out a couple...
  5. The super 45.70: Marlin's .450M and the rifles that use it

    Facing its 15th birthday this year is the Hornady inspired and Marlin developed "modernized" .45-70 that is known far and wide as the .450 Marlin. This straight-walled bruiser, which is capable of providing a vehicle for bullets up to 500-grains in weight, is a new take on a big game cowboy guns. What is .450? Debuted at the year 2000 SHOT Show in Las Vegas, Hornady and Marlin introduced a round developed by ammo genius Mitch Mittelstaedt. Although similar to a .458 Win Mag (or its parent,...
  6. You got target rifle in my small game gun! The tale of the Marlin 880SQ

    For a brief period in time, Marlin made a handy .22LR bolt action rifle that with a 7-shot detachable box mag that made a great little field gun. At the same time, they made a tack-driving benchrest rifle with a heavy target barrel. Well, someone at some point had the brilliant crackle of imagination to brainstorm what happened if they put the better of each one together. The 880 series An evolution of the company's Model 780 rifle, this 5.75-pound field, and tin can special used a very...
  7. Marlin Peep Sights 101

    Aperture sights, often just called "peep sights" have been around on Marlin rifles both from the factory and as an aftermarket accessory for more than a century. These sights are, for many, the best alternative to optics and have proven themselves for generations in both target and hunting applications. What are they? Basically speaking, peep sights work through a theory called parallax suppression (for an excellent 23-page explanation of just what this is). The concept goes that the human...
  8. Marlin Model 90: The New Haven Double Barrel

    With a company, that has a history now in its third decade; it shouldn't surprise anyone that Marlin has made everything from break-top revolvers, to machine guns for the military, to rifles in calibers from .17HMR to .458 Magnum. They have even made some shotguns to include a very nice boxlock double. (Although discontinued in 1959, the Marlin Model 90 can still make a great upland game piece. Photo from 16-gauge World) Design These guns came about in 1936 when Sears asked Marlin to...
  9. Quick thinking homeowner's photo leads to arrest of Marlin burglar

    When a Louisiana resident came home last week, they thought something was odd with the gray 2003 Hyundai Elantra parked in their driveway. They thought it was even stranger when a 25-year-old man she did not know came out her back door carrying a bunch of guns. What happened next was classic. The town Natchitoches Parish nestled in Northwestern Louisiana is a rural area known for its bountiful natural resources including Cane River Creole National Historical Park, Kisatchie National...
  10. Marlin's classic stock-tubed Models 88/98

    If you have been around Marlin rifles for a minute, you are used to tubular underbarrel mags, detachable box mags, and even single-shots. However a short-lived series of rimfire plinkers you may not be aware of also exist that load completely differently. The Marlin Model 98--note the side loading port in the buttstock You load it where? In the years after World War II, Marlin was looking to expand their offerings with some new blood. A popular rifle of the time was the Browning Semi-Auto...
  11. The Marlin lever action rifle in the hands of an Apache Chief

    During the Plains Wars of the last half of the 19th Century, the U.S. Army employed hundreds of volunteer Indian Scouts, first authorized by Congress in 1866. One of these, Al-Che-Say, of the White Mountain Apache, became decorated veteran of the conflict. This Medal of Honor recipient also was a fan of Marlin lever guns. Who was Alchesay? Born in 1853 Arizona Territory, the 19-year old was already a skilled warrior when he joined the U.S. Army in 1872 as part of Gen. Crook's Expedition...
  12. What's new and what's gone from Marlin's 2015 Lineup

    Last week Marlin Firearms released their new 2015 catalog and in its short 12-pages are somethings new, somethings old, somethings borrowed, and somethings blue. With that in mind, we broke it down to see just what is in store for the coming year. New guns [MEDIA=youtube]DqMgYhK2TgQ[/MEDIA] George Kollitides Marlin 2015 Catalog Intro While many manufacturers such (Ruger anyone?) seem to introduce a new gun every week, it seems that Marlin, in the spirit of their cautious...
  13. Marlin's Faux 22 M1 Carbine, the Model 989M2

    Today the AR-15 series rifles are perhaps the most popular semi-auto firearms in the country. In the early 1960s, when the AR was still unknown, the go-to rifle for medium game hunting and home defense was the M1 Carbine. With this understood, Marlin went about creating a M1-ish carbine for small game hunters and plinkers. This gun we know today as the Model 989M2. Just what was the M1 anyway? Formally, the "United States Carbine, Caliber .30, M1," but commonly just referred to as the M1,...
  14. Marlin Rare Semi-Auto: The Open Bolt Marlin Model 50

    Odds are, you either cut your teeth on or have at least at one point in your life fired a Marlin semi-auto .22LR rifle. Today, the tube-fed Model 60 and its detachable-magazine Model 70 half-brother are the benchmark for rimfire auto-loaders around the world. Who would have thought that this all started in 84-years ago with the humble Model 50. Why was it born? Marlin, coming out of the "Roaring 20s" was a company looking to change. It had established itself with lever-action rifles and...
  15. Q: 784-pound bear? A: Marlin 45-70. End of Story

    "We heard cracking in the woods, and I realized the bear was coming straight at me," recalled a 16-year-old Tarheel State hunter on his very first trip into the field during the state's annual bear season came across an absolutely immense bruin. What happened next stunned the young sportsman. The problem Bears have always been numerous in North Carolina. Going all the way back to 1761, British Colonel Henry Timberlake accompanied a delegation of Cherokees into the area and reported the...
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