Articles from Editor

  1. The Classic Marlin Model 39: Rimfire Lever Perfection

    Marlin Firearms spent the first half-century or so if its existence concentrating on center-fire rifles, shotguns and revolvers. However, after World War I, the company switched gears, made a play for the popgun market--, and got it nearly perfect right off the bat. Why the 39? Rimfire pipsqueak cartridges have been around since the 1850s when Smith and Wesson crafted the first .22 Short, which led in turn to the upgraded 22 Long some 15 years later and finally, in 1887, the .22LR. Even...
  2. How to Properly Pronounce 10 Gun Names You're Likely Saying Wrong (VIDEO)

    By default, if you are a member here (or just stopping by), odds are you are a dyed-in-the-wool Marlin fan. However, even you likely have had at least a few of the below pass through your hands at one time or another. There are few things more embarrassing for a new gun owner than mispronouncing the name of a firearm. It's even more embarrassing for a long-time gun owner. To help the gun owning public, our friends over at OutdoorHub put together this great video to lay out how to better...
  3. Forgotten perfection: The Marlin MR-7 bolt action rifle

    Marlin over the years has stepped up to the plate and provided an enduring series of bolt-action rifles over the past several decades. These guns all had two things in common: first, they were largely excellent designs. Second: their production run ended too soon. Perhaps none of their historic offerings hits these two points harder than the MR-7. Why the design? Known primarily for its semi-auto and lever-action rifles, Marlin has also dabbled in throw-bolt guns off and on as well. Back...
  4. Meet the $50,000 Marlin Model 1889 Lever Action Rifle

    Founded by John Mahlon Marlin in North Haven, Connecticut in 1870, the Marlin Firearms Company within just a couple decades had become a strong contender in the gun industry. One of its most popular, and in many ways, most enduring of designs, the Model of 1889, has proven to be among the most collectable of the breed. Moreover, you wouldn't believe what some of these old guns go for. The design of the 1889 Marlin's first two cowboy rifles, the Models of 1881 and 1888, were catch-up guns...
  5. Veteran huntress and teeth puller scores again with her trusty Marlin

    Dr. Mili Irizarry de Buschatzke, a Cazenovia New York dentist and skilled outdoorswoman, once more bagged a very nick buck during the first weekend of the Empire State's brief but bountiful gun season-- with her Marlin .270 at her side. No stranger to bucks Dr. Irizarry is something of a modern-day Diana, who, year after year manages to harvest excellent sized mature bucks, doing her part in the wildlife conservation process. In 2010, she took a nice 6-point in upstate Madison County on...
  6. Understanding Shotgun Chokes

    Shotgun chokes were designed to control pattern diameters at different yards. What is a pattern? It is just the grouping of the pellets at a given yardage. This grouping or pattern is measured by a circle diameter. This particular circle must have certain efficiency. In other words, it has to have a certain number of pellets in a given area (called distribution) for it to be labeled an efficient pattern. Here is a quick reference chart: Shotgun Choke..... Yardage...........Shotgun Choke...
  7. Marlin 93: Classic collectable cowboy rifle

    In the tail end of the Old West, Marlin was still a new company. However, they were punching far out of their weight class with an innovative solid-framed lever action rifle in a variety of calibers for hunters, and homestead defenders alike. Today we simply remember it as the Model 93, and if you run across one for a good price, you are a lucky cowboy indeed. Why? When John M. Marlin hung his shingle out for the first time in 1870, he spent the first decade of the company's history making...
  8. Marlin releases new big loop 1895 GSBL in .45-70

    Those who are a fan of big-bore cowboy action rifles have long known of Marlin's 1895 series rifle. Take this gun and chop it down to make it a guide length carbine, give it a big-loop finger lever, make it stainless steel with a blackened FNC finish, and add a painted and laminated stock-- well that's the GSBL baby. A little history Marlin actually introduced their lever action rifles back in the 1880s with their classic Model 1895 made between 1895 (hence the name) and the entrance of...
  9. Burglar Bear: 0, Homeowner with Marlin: 1

    When Victor Peters found a 400-pound black bear tearing through his sunroom in a search for food Wednesday night, the mild-mannered retired park ranger wanted things to work out amicably for both sides. However, when the bear decided otherwise, Peters had his Marlin 1895 there to help even the odds. A black bear, similar to this one, attacked a Florida man's home on two consecutive nights. Photo Wikipedia. The first break in The story began the day before when Peters, 64, of Lady Lake,...
  10. Your Marlin 30.30 as a home defense carbine?

    With all the emphasis today on modern long guns in home defense roles, it's easy to get confused about what is an ideal rifle for these types of scenarios. Well the thing is, you may already have a hard-hitting short-action rifle already in the back of your gun case that can fit the bill just fine. Using a long arm for home defense Any time you encounter the prospect of using a firearm inside a home, you have to worry about two things: over penetration and functionality. Any cartridge...
  11. Updated offerings for your legacy Marlin 30.30

    The .30-30 Winchester round (also known as the .30 Winchester Center Fire or WCF) has been around for 120 years or so, making it one of the most durable rifle rounds of all time. The Marlin lever action rifles chambered to fire it, likewise have been updated constantly since that time. With that in mind, let us look at the more modern loadings that will take your cowboy gun from 1895 to 2014. This old Marlin Revelations Model 30 can be updated to take deer out to 300-400 yards with the...
  12. Vintage Trombone Action Marlin pop guns

    Back around the turn of the century, slide-action rifles were all the rage. You see this was before the age of the reliable semi-auto and many makers had jumped on the pump gun bandwagon. No less a company than J. Marlin's firearms factory was no exception, turning out no less than a half dozen models before World War Two. (Marlin Model 18) Why the slide? In the 1900s, if you wanted a fast handling rifle, you went pump action. With no reliable semi-automatics on the market, bolt-actions...
  13. One for the bring back list: The Marlin Midget Magnum

    Made in limited numbers for only a brief period, the rifle was designated the Model 25MB, but everyone knows this handy little take down carbine best as the Midget Magnum. Those who known it love it. Those who haven't probably will, and that's the problem because those that have them already aren't letting go. Origins In 1979, Marlin introduced a basic little bolt-action .22 with a 7-shot detachable single-stack box magazine and 22-inch barrel. This rifle, the Glenfield Model 25, was a...
  14. The 308 and 338 Marlin Express

    Within the past decade, Marlin, in cooperation with the ammunition wonks over at Hornady, have come up with a solution to the problem that generation after generation of cowboy carbine lover has lamented-- how do you get a long-range rifle round to fit in a tubular magazine? You see for well over a century, short, fat cartridges that mounted stubby bullets have handicapped the lever-action rifle. This is because these rounds, resting bullet point to primer bottom, risked detonation if said...
  15. Why the Marlin 336 makes the perfect first deer gun

    As a 13-year-old boy, growing up in the South, deer hunting was in my blood from early childhood. I had often helped dress and clean animals that had been harvested by my uncles and grandpa during our long (Sept-Feb) annual whitetail season and clamored for the opportunity to go along with the rest of the 'tribe.' While I had cut my teeth on rabbit, squirrel, and dove in my lower elementary years, learning how to work a bolt-action .22LR and a crack-barrel 20-gauge stoked with low-brass...
Loading...