Example Category

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  • The Art of Cold Bluing as Applied to a Marlin

    I have been doing a lot of research on the pros/cons of Cold Bluing vs Hot Salt Bluing as well as the different procedures people use to Cold Blue barrels and parts. There are a lot ideas and products out there to choose from and everyone has their favorites or what works for them to the level they are happy with. My level is as close to perfection as I can get. The reasons for all my research are I am what most would call a little A/R. The comments on how clean I keep my workstation are...
  • Forgotten Tube-fed bolt rimfires: The Marlin 781 and 783

    You say that you love the underbarrel tubular magazine of the classic Model 60 but also want the nice, steady, short-throw bolt action of the 800 series Marlins and a groovy walnut stock? Man, if they made that in one gun, it would be heaven, right? Well the good old JM Marlin Company did just that in the 1970s and 80s with the 781 series rifle and its cousins. The design In 1970, Marlin perfected their 780 series rifle, which is a nice little .22 rimfire that had a natty Monte...
  • The Screaming hot Marlin 336SC Zipper of yesteryear

    If you are a predator or varmint hunter, odds are the thought of a 50-ish grain .22 caliber bullet with a velocity of over 3200 feet per second would get your attention. Well the thing is, the round itself has existed for almost a century as the .219 Zipper and furthermore, there is a classic JM rifle that chambered it and it's considered one of the "holy grails" of modern Marlin lever guns. What is the Zip? As explained by Gun Digest's Dan Sheeler, the .219 Zipper was birthed out into the...
  • Marlin's 375 North Haven Big Bore

    For a few brief years in the Reagan-era, Marlin ponied up a lever-action hunting rifle that was among the pinnacle in hard-hitting big game guns of its kind. Based on the same 1895 action proven over the course of a century, the new gun used a very old round that had similarly been reinvented. What is the .375 Win? Back in the 1880s, one of the most effective "cowboy" rounds was the big-bore .38-55 Winchester. This black powder fueled cartridge could send a 255-grain bullet out a couple...
  • The Marlin Model 60

    With so many great .22 rifles out there, competition is stiff. Ruger's 10/22, Remington's Nylon and Speedmaster series, the Savage 64, and the single shot Cricket and Chipmunks are out there in numbers that in some cases run into the millions. However, the title of the most popular 22-caliber rifle in the world, with more than 11-million examples produced, goes to the Marlin Model 60. Let's look at the iconic rifle. Design of the Model 60 In 1959 Marlin engineer Ewald Nichol took to create...
  1. 1895 Lever Action Rifle

    From Batter Mans I've always been fascinated by classic lever actions from the 1800s. Take the Marlin 1895 Lever Action Rifle, for instance. There are a variety of versions for this rifle, but I'm going to highlight the standard Marlin 1895. It is a gun that retained all of its classic futures, but has been upgraded to join the modern the world, and it was responsible for bringing back the powerful .45-70 cartridge. .45-70 Cartridge This was a round developed for the US Army Springfield...
  2. Bolt Action Marlin Sako rifles: The Model 322

    When you think Marlin, most people have a .22 rifle or lever-action cowboy gun spring to mind. Then of course the company also (briefly) made shotguns and revolvers as well as bolt action centerfires. Wait, what was that last part again? Oh you mean you never heard of the Model 322? Well, pull up a chair. (This 322 is a nice example that has had its original peep sight removed and a scope added. Be aware of changes like this when looking at a 322) Finnish heritage In the far away land of...
  3. Burglar Bear: 0, Homeowner with Marlin: 1

    When Victor Peters found a 400-pound black bear tearing through his sunroom in a search for food Wednesday night, the mild-mannered retired park ranger wanted things to work out amicably for both sides. However, when the bear decided otherwise, Peters had his Marlin 1895 there to help even the odds. A black bear, similar to this one, attacked a Florida man's home on two consecutive nights. Photo Wikipedia. The first break in The story began the day before when Peters, 64, of Lady Lake,...
  4. Buying a Used Marlin Lever

    The Marlin Firearms Company has in one way or another been in business for over 140 years. Throughout that time, one thing has remained constant: the production of lever action rifles. With literally 30 million of these guns out there floating around, there are a few things to look for in used ones. Stock and forearm This 'bullseye' insert will let you know whether a rifle stock is made of birch or walnut and also give you a clue as to when it was made. Unless you are getting a...
  5. Cleaning and maintaining your rifles

    Marlin has long produced bolt-action rifles culminating with the MR-7 and later X7 series today as well as legacy semi-autos. However, keeping your rifle in tip-top condition is up to you. The primarily area of attacking the burnt carbon, metal shavings, and corrosive primer chemicals left behind by every range or field session is the barreled action. With a safe and unloaded weapon, with no brass or ammo around, remove your bolt and set it to the side. Next, use your cleaning rod in the...
  6. Did Marlin Ever Make Handguns

    Those of you that are well aware of everything that was the Marlin Firearms Company over the past 100+ years know that the company had its hand in everything that went boom from time to time. Besides their classic lines of rifles, they made shotguns, machineguns, military weapons, and yes, Virginia, even a pretty large line of revolvers. Classic Marlin Pistols and Revolvers William Brophy in his excellent work, Marlin Firearms: A History of the Guns and the Company That Made Them, possibly...
  7. Enter the 177: Marlin Air Rifles

    When you think Marlin Firearms, you think just that-- firearms. Well it seems that there is also a Marlin-branded air rifle on the market today for those little shooters to enjoy as well. With that in mind, we look at the Marlin Cowboy. Marlin air guns? Over the past 130 years, Marlin has made a number of different items including shotguns, burp guns, machine guns, and handguns besides the standard list of .22 rifles, lever guns and bolt-action rigs. However, members ask about old Marlin...
  8. Enter The Bersa Giveaway Before It's Too Late!

    The BersaForum.com Bersa Thunder 380 Giveaway closes soon and I need you to get entered. You can get this exact Bersa shipped direct to your FFL if your name is drawn from the giveaway thread at the completion of the giveaway. To get entered follow this link: [URL]http://www.bersaforum.com/forum/f5/bersa-thunder-duotone-380-giveaway-1361/[/URL] Thanks to the great folks over at Eagle Imports for this great donation, and I look forward to seeing your entry on BersaForum.com!
  9. Famous Old West Marlin Users

    Looking at the synthetic stocked brand new CNC machined rifle on your gun rack with its micro-grooved barrel, you would be hard-pressed to realize that some of the legends of the Old West carried Marlin rifles. Here are a few you may have heard of: Annie Oakley One of the most famous of all shootists was Ms. Phoebe Ann Moses, better known by her stage name of Annie Oakley. She was a great admirer of Marlin rimfire rifles and perhaps her best-known trick was centered on one. She repeatedly...
  10. Five Classic Marlin Rifles

    Marlin has been in the gun biz for going on 150-years. Founded just after the Civil War by John Mahlon Marlin, they have produced more than a hundred models of firearms in almost every caliber imaginable. Here we look at five of their timeless classics. These guns were all extremely popular standard production models that helped make the brand a household name. Model 1895 Lewis Hepburn was Marlin's preeminent firearms designer in the 19th century. He invented a long line of lever action...
  11. Forgotten perfection: The Marlin MR-7 bolt action rifle

    Marlin over the years has stepped up to the plate and provided an enduring series of bolt-action rifles over the past several decades. These guns all had two things in common: first, they were largely excellent designs. Second: their production run ended too soon. Perhaps none of their historic offerings hits these two points harder than the MR-7. Why the design? Known primarily for its semi-auto and lever-action rifles, Marlin has also dabbled in throw-bolt guns off and on as well. Back...
  12. Forgotten Tube-fed bolt rimfires: The Marlin 781 and 783

    You say that you love the underbarrel tubular magazine of the classic Model 60 but also want the nice, steady, short-throw bolt action of the 800 series Marlins and a groovy walnut stock? Man, if they made that in one gun, it would be heaven, right? Well the good old JM Marlin Company did just that in the 1970s and 80s with the 781 series rifle and its cousins. The design In 1970, Marlin perfected their 780 series rifle, which is a nice little .22 rimfire that had a natty Monte...
  13. Hey, that gun looks like a Marlin but it doesn't say so anywhere on it...

    Over the nearly two century long history of the company, Marlin has always made their own guns. In fact, for a good bit of the 20th Century, Marlin even made guns under different names for outfits like Montgomery Ward, C and C, and Western Auto, which were the precursors for the big box stores of today. These guns were given 'house' names when being sold at bargain basement prices, but deep down inside they are still Marlins. Marlin Model 336 right? Well, its actually a Glenfield Model 30A....
  14. High on the Hog with Marlin Lever Actions

    Marlin has been in the lever gun biz for a bit over a hundred years. When they first started, their guns were often used to hunt wild game including feral pigs, javelina, and boar. Well, a century later, we still have a hard time finding something that does a better job of it. Just why is it so good? The Marlin lever action rifle, no matter whether it\'s a 336, 1895, Model 444, or what, is a short and stubby gun. By rigorous definition, these guns are almost all \'carbine\' sized rifles....
  15. How short can you get? The pre-1934 Marlin SBRs

    In the 1930s, the wise members of Congress passed legislation that established the National Firearms Act, which regulated the civilian use and ownership of all the cool guns such as those, capable of full-auto fire, cane guns, pen guns, silencers, and short-barreled rifles. It is this last class that caught up a number of innocent Marlin lever guns in the dragnet. A rare Chilean police-marked Model 94 Marlin saddle ring trapper in .44-40 (with a 900-yard ladder sight!) and a super short...
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