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  • How short can you get? The pre-1934 Marlin SBRs

    In the 1930s, the wise members of Congress passed legislation that established the National Firearms Act, which regulated the civilian use and ownership of all the cool guns such as those, capable of full-auto fire, cane guns, pen guns, silencers, and short-barreled rifles. It is this last class that caught up a number of innocent Marlin lever guns in the dragnet. A rare Chilean police-marked Model 94 Marlin saddle ring trapper in .44-40 (with a 900-yard ladder sight!) and a super short...
  • The little known Marlin Model 200 crack barrel shotgun

    It a fit of growth before being acquired by Remington, in 2000 Marlin purchased the assets of H&R 1871, a Massachusetts-based firearms maker who had likewise made guns under the moniker of NEF for generations. This company, the largest manufacturer of single shot shotguns and rifles in the world, even made a Marlin branded shotgun for a brief period. Marlin's single shot background Known primarily for their rifles, Marlin Firearms of New Haven, Connecticut also sold a line of shotguns for...
  • The Marlin lever action rifle in the hands of an Apache Chief

    During the Plains Wars of the last half of the 19th Century, the U.S. Army employed hundreds of volunteer Indian Scouts, first authorized by Congress in 1866. One of these, Al-Che-Say, of the White Mountain Apache, became decorated veteran of the conflict. This Medal of Honor recipient also was a fan of Marlin lever guns. Who was Alchesay? Born in 1853 Arizona Territory, the 19-year old was already a skilled warrior when he joined the U.S. Army in 1872 as part of Gen. Crook's Expedition...
  • The Marlin Guide Gun

    Need a hard-hitting brush gun capable of taking any game in North America? Well the Marlin Guide Gun could be the answer to those needs. Why the Guide Gun? The brush gun has long been defined as a handy rifle with a large heavy bullet. Usually lever-actions, hinge-breaks, or short action carbines, these guns are chambered in rounds like .30-.30, .300 Savage, and .35 Remington. While suitable for white tail, wolves, and small bear, these rounds are a little light when chasing elk and...
  • Marlin's Deer Mauser: The Model 455

    The name Mauser is legendary when it comes to bolt-action rifles. Their design in the late 1800s heralded a new age of firearms technology and revolutionized the military\'s of the day. This led to an evolution in hunting rifles that soon followed. And yes, Marlin even had one of these in the stable for a while. We give you the Model 455. Belgian roots In the 1950s the international firearms mega plant of Fabrique Nationale in Liege, Belgium was transitioning from making Mauser...
  1. The rock and roll Marlin: the M1918 BAR

    Today each Army and Marine fire team contains at least one hard charger who is designated the squad automatic weapon man. This position, first conceived back in 1918, was until the disco era composed of a Joe or Leatherneck armed with a BAR. What's a BAR you ask? (A Marlin-Rockwell M1918 BAR, via Julia auctions) John Browning's trench sweeper Officially designated "Rifle, Caliber .30, Automatic, Browning, M1918," this 16-pound light machine gun was revolutionary when it was introduced in...
  2. Marlin Camp Carbine

    One of the classic modern rifles from Marlin's line wasn't in a rifle caliber. Produced for almost two decades, the pistol-caliber Camp Carbine is well remembered and growing in collectability. Design The Marlin Camp carbine was a elegant and utilitarian little rifle. Introduced in 1985 during the height of the Ruger Ranch Rifle craze, it offered a handy little blow back operated semi auto rifle that chambered inexpensive handgun ammunition. Chambered in either 9x19mm Parabellum or the...
  3. The Marlin Machine Guns

    Most Marlin owners know of their long legacy of lever action rifles, .22 rimfire guns, and others. However, what most don't know is that the company was one of the largest manufacturers of machine guns in World War One. The Colt-Marlin Light Machine Gun In 1915, during World War I, a New York syndicate bought the company from the sons of John Marlin, the company's founder, and renamed it the Marlin Rockwell Corporation (MRC). In that same year, MRC obtained license to the 1895 Colt Light...
  4. The Marlin Guide Gun

    Need a hard-hitting brush gun capable of taking any game in North America? Well the Marlin Guide Gun could be the answer to those needs. Why the Guide Gun? The brush gun has long been defined as a handy rifle with a large heavy bullet. Usually lever-actions, hinge-breaks, or short action carbines, these guns are chambered in rounds like .30-.30, .300 Savage, and .35 Remington. While suitable for white tail, wolves, and small bear, these rounds are a little light when chasing elk and...
  5. The Marlin Sporting Carbine

    Marlin has been known for its lever-action rifles for decades; however, one particular version of them, the Sporting Carbine, is much rarer than others. The original 1893SC Marlin firearms, at the time based in New Haven, Connecticut, perfected their standard solid-top, side-ejection 1893 lever-action rifle in 1893 (hence the name) The gun, with a 24" standard barrel, was popular but some wanted something more handy. For this purpose Marlin shortened the barrel to 20-inches, dropped the...
  6. Marlin Hammer Spur Extensions

    If you mount a receiver-top scope on the roof of your Marlin lever-gun and need to still cock your hammer to fire, you are going to need an extension as the eyepiece is going to come back too far to squeeze any but the narrowest of thumbs into. Marlin has for a long time shipped the proper extension inside a small plastic bag stapled to the interior of the box. If your rifle is missing the box or was bought new, you may be missing it and have to find one. This short article will help you...
  7. The Marlin Model 2000 Target Rifles

    Marlin firearms, first founded in 1870 by Mr. John Mahlon Marlin, have been in the rifle business for over 140 years. Most collectors are familiar with their series of .22 plinkers, and game-getters, their vast array of lever action brush guns, and their Glenfield series of shotguns. A group of firearms that even most die-hard Marlin experts don't remember is the M2000 series of precision target rifles. The 2000 series platform Marlin firearms decided to punch out of their comfort level...
  8. The Marlin 444

    Marlin has long been the king of lever action rifles, and without a doubt the .444 Marlin has been one of the most popular heavy rounds of the last half century. Now as the round is fast coming up on its 60th birthday, let's put some perspective into the big .444 slugger. Why the need Large game hunters in North America in the late 19th century discovered the venerable .45-70 Government round. The .45-70 was adopted by the US Army in 1873 and used in all of the late Indian Wars as well as...
  9. The Marlin UD M42 Submachine gun

    During World War 2, dozens of new weapons were rushed into service around the world. One of those that you may not have heard of was the M-42 submachine gun. You may be interested to know that a certain well-known firearms manufacturer made this rare and exotic weapon by the name of Marlin. Why the UD M-42 At the entrance of the United States into World War 2 in December 1941, the standard US submachine gun was the Thompson Auto. The Thompson was and still is a beautiful gun but it was...
  10. The Marlin Model 60

    With so many great .22 rifles out there, competition is stiff. Ruger's 10/22, Remington's Nylon and Speedmaster series, the Savage 64, and the single shot Cricket and Chipmunks are out there in numbers that in some cases run into the millions. However, the title of the most popular 22-caliber rifle in the world, with more than 11-million examples produced, goes to the Marlin Model 60. Let's look at the iconic rifle. Design of the Model 60 In 1959 Marlin engineer Ewald Nichol took to create...
  11. Marlin 60 Muzzlelite Bullpup Stocks

    Have an old Model 60 and want to upgrade that 1960s squirrel gun look for something more modern without harming the gun itself? A Muzzlelite Bullpup stock may be just what you are looking for. Why Bullpup designs have been around since the 1900s, take the magazine and action of a semi-automatic rifle, and place it behind the trigger, making the overall length of the rifle shorter. The Muzzlelite Bullpup stock for the Marlin Model 60 does this in a dramatic way. By relocating the trigger...
  12. The 22 Marlin Dragunov

    The Marlin Model 60 and its 22LR cousins such as the 75, 99, 990 and others, have been a staple of gunracks across the country for decades. However, some of us grow old of the standard walnut stocks and want to branch out into something more tactical. The ATI Fiberforce stock ATI, long known for their aftermarket gunstocks and accessories, introduced their Fiberforce stock for the classic Marlin Model 60 more than ten years ago. Retailing for $49 on their website, it is made of DuPont...
  13. Marlins New XT-22 Rifle

    In their new Mayfield Kentucky plant, Marlin is setting the state to redefine the bolt-action 22 rifle. This debut series, dubbed the XT-22, has all the makings of a rimfire legend. Design of the XT22 Taking the New Haven produced 2004-2010 eras Marlin 925 as a starting point, the company made several improvements and the XT22 was born. The firearm comes in at 5.5 pounds unloaded which means you can put a decent set of optics, nice rings, a strap, and camowrap on it for heavy use in the...
  14. Famous Old West Marlin Users

    Looking at the synthetic stocked brand new CNC machined rifle on your gun rack with its micro-grooved barrel, you would be hard-pressed to realize that some of the legends of the Old West carried Marlin rifles. Here are a few you may have heard of: Annie Oakley One of the most famous of all shootists was Ms. Phoebe Ann Moses, better known by her stage name of Annie Oakley. She was a great admirer of Marlin rimfire rifles and perhaps her best-known trick was centered on one. She repeatedly...
  15. King of the Swamp the Model 55

    When I was a kid, my great uncle Gus took me out to the delta marsh of the oxbow lakes of the Mississippi River. For those unaware of the area, this is one of the finest parts of the country to sit and wait for flight after beautiful flight of wood ducks, snow geese, and Canadian geese to fly over. The night before the trip he reached far back into his closet and retrieved a bundle the size of a pair of baseball bats wrapped in an old wool blanket and tied with a piece of cord. "Here you...
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