Example Category

This is an example article management system category.

  • High on the Hog with Marlin Lever Actions

    Marlin has been in the lever gun biz for a bit over a hundred years. When they first started, their guns were often used to hunt wild game including feral pigs, javelina, and boar. Well, a century later, we still have a hard time finding something that does a better job of it. Just why is it so good? The Marlin lever action rifle, no matter whether it\'s a 336, 1895, Model 444, or what, is a short and stubby gun. By rigorous definition, these guns are almost all \'carbine\' sized rifles....
  • Marlin 60 Muzzlelite Bullpup Stocks

    Have an old Model 60 and want to upgrade that 1960s squirrel gun look for something more modern without harming the gun itself? A Muzzlelite Bullpup stock may be just what you are looking for. Why Bullpup designs have been around since the 1900s, take the magazine and action of a semi-automatic rifle, and place it behind the trigger, making the overall length of the rifle shorter. The Muzzlelite Bullpup stock for the Marlin Model 60 does this in a dramatic way. By relocating the trigger...
  • The Marlin Machine Guns

    Most Marlin owners know of their long legacy of lever action rifles, .22 rimfire guns, and others. However, what most don't know is that the company was one of the largest manufacturers of machine guns in World War One. The Colt-Marlin Light Machine Gun In 1915, during World War I, a New York syndicate bought the company from the sons of John Marlin, the company's founder, and renamed it the Marlin Rockwell Corporation (MRC). In that same year, MRC obtained license to the 1895 Colt Light...
  • Setting up your rifle

    Once you have your rifle and scope picked out, you have other considerations to make and other options to take when it comes to outfitting the final package. -Stock Ideally, your rifle should fit you as perfectly as if it was made for you by the god of war and handed down via a procession of his imps who laid it gently at your feet. Unfortunately, unless you go to a custom rifle maker and have it made to spec you are most likely left with having to work with what you have. However, do not...
  • The Classic Single Shot Marlin 22

    The single shot Marlin rimfire 22 is possibly the ultimate initial training rifle. With a nomenclature and manipulation procedure that can be taught in a morning, the gun is simple enough that first time shooters can easily understand. With no magazine to fumble with, nor semi-automatic action to worry about, the gun can be loaded one round at a time by a more seasoned shooter while the apprentice works the bolt. After a few rounds of this, even a pre-teen youth can be trusted with the...
  1. The Classic Single Shot Marlin 22

    The single shot Marlin rimfire 22 is possibly the ultimate initial training rifle. With a nomenclature and manipulation procedure that can be taught in a morning, the gun is simple enough that first time shooters can easily understand. With no magazine to fumble with, nor semi-automatic action to worry about, the gun can be loaded one round at a time by a more seasoned shooter while the apprentice works the bolt. After a few rounds of this, even a pre-teen youth can be trusted with the...
  2. Marlin's Turn of the Century pump: The Model 19 shotgun

    Produced for a scant two-year period, the often-overlooked Marlin Model 19 was a scattergun with class that signaled the end of 19th century thinking and stepped boldly towards a modern design that we can appreciate today. Bloodlines A superb Marlin 1898 shotgun Starting in 1898 Marlin made its first slide or trombone action shotgun, the imaginatively named Model 1898. This remained in production for almost a decade when it was replaced by the "teen series" (M16 and 17) guns which gave...
  3. Forgotten Tube-fed bolt rimfires: The Marlin 781 and 783

    You say that you love the underbarrel tubular magazine of the classic Model 60 but also want the nice, steady, short-throw bolt action of the 800 series Marlins and a groovy walnut stock? Man, if they made that in one gun, it would be heaven, right? Well the good old JM Marlin Company did just that in the 1970s and 80s with the 781 series rifle and its cousins. The design In 1970, Marlin perfected their 780 series rifle, which is a nice little .22 rimfire that had a natty Monte...
  4. Marlin Rare Semi-Auto: The Open Bolt Marlin Model 50

    Odds are, you either cut your teeth on or have at least at one point in your life fired a Marlin semi-auto .22LR rifle. Today, the tube-fed Model 60 and its detachable-magazine Model 70 half-brother are the benchmark for rimfire auto-loaders around the world. Who would have thought that this all started in 84-years ago with the humble Model 50. Why was it born? Marlin, coming out of the "Roaring 20s" was a company looking to change. It had established itself with lever-action rifles and...
  5. Marlin's unique .410 Lever Action Shotgun

    If asked to name perhaps the most popular lever action rifles in history, odds are Marlin would top that short list of answers. The thing is, did you know that Marlin made a shotgun version of the carbine? Better yet, that it was in sweet-shooting .410? If not then keep reading... The classic Model 410 In 1929, Marlin took their standard Model 1883 lever action rifle and reworked it as a shotgun. To do this they had to lengthen the loading port, modify the tubular magazine, and replace the...
  6. The shotgun that hits like a rifle: Marlin's 512 Slugmaster

    When the sabot slug hit the U.S. market in the late 1960s, it provided impetus for shotgun makers to design guns able to maximize the potential of these new rounds that could provide rifle-like accuracy out to a football field or more, effectively doubling the reach of the standard scattergun. This led to the Model 512. Marlin's flirtation with slug-guns Connecticut-based Marlin had been in the shotgun biz going all the way back to the 1890s. As the industry evolved so did the company,...
  7. When Marlin went big bore: The Original Super Goose

    For just a brief but glorious time, Marlin gave the masses of water fowlers what could be considered one of the most popular bolt-action large caliber shotguns of its day-- the 34-inch barreled Model 5510. And yes, the "10" is the size of the gauge. The bolt-action Marlin burners Today the Marlin Firearms Company is best known for its line of rimfire plinkers and lever-action hunting rifles, but they also made shotguns for nearly a solid century. Between 1903-1954 they produced no less...
  8. Marlin's compact triple four, the Model 444P Outfitter

    Marlin has long been the king of lever action rifles, and without a doubt the .444 Marlin has been one of the most popular heavy rounds of the last half century, which could mean that the briefly made Outfitter model with its abbreviated barrel is the compact king of the woods. The Design of the .444 Marlin Round Taking a fat, wide-necked 57mm long case (almost as long as a 7mm Mauser's); the Marlin Company mashed a .429" round on top to create a moose of a cartridge. It was longer by...
  9. Ultimate Marlin brush gun: The Model 62 Levermatic

    For a brief time in the 1960s, Marlin recast its vintage cowboy action rifle line into something a little more responsive and, using state of the art chamberings, was on the cutting edge of lever gun technology. Sadly, it wasn't to last. The Levermatic family Marlin firearms engineering guru Tom Robinson was issued patent number 2,823,480 Feb 18, 1956 for the Levermatic receiver, a system that he developed several years before from the Kessler Arms Company's "Lever-Matic" shotgun. What was...
  10. The Marlin 99-M1 Carbine

    One of the most popular rifles of the World War 2 era was the M-1 carbine. The short and handy little .30 caliber rifle, with its short length of pull, one-piece wooden stock, and abbreviated barrel, was standard issue to thousands of troops across Europe and the Pacific. Marlin capitalized on the mystique of this popular rifle when it came out with its own version in .22LR, the 99M1. What was the M1 Carbine? Formally, the "United States Carbine, Caliber .30, M1," but commonly just...
  11. Marlin Hammer Spur Extensions

    If you mount a receiver-top scope on the roof of your Marlin lever-gun and need to still cock your hammer to fire, you are going to need an extension as the eyepiece is going to come back too far to squeeze any but the narrowest of thumbs into. Marlin has for a long time shipped the proper extension inside a small plastic bag stapled to the interior of the box. If your rifle is missing the box or was bought new, you may be missing it and have to find one. This short article will help you...
  12. Forgotten perfection: The Marlin MR-7 bolt action rifle

    Marlin over the years has stepped up to the plate and provided an enduring series of bolt-action rifles over the past several decades. These guns all had two things in common: first, they were largely excellent designs. Second: their production run ended too soon. Perhaps none of their historic offerings hits these two points harder than the MR-7. Why the design? Known primarily for its semi-auto and lever-action rifles, Marlin has also dabbled in throw-bolt guns off and on as well. Back...
  13. The Marlin Model 70 A Quiet Crowd Pleaser

    One of the most desired and best-loved designs that Marlin ever came out with was the Model 70. This handy little 22 with its detachable box magazine had something for everyone--including those in need of a backpack gun. Basic design Taking the tried and true Model 60 design as a starting point, Marlin engineers borrowed the receiver and action from that little 22 plinker and substituted a detachable box magazine for the under barrel tubular one of the 60. This cut the magazine capacity...
  14. Marlin Model 90: The New Haven Double Barrel

    With a company, that has a history now in its third decade; it shouldn't surprise anyone that Marlin has made everything from break-top revolvers, to machine guns for the military, to rifles in calibers from .17HMR to .458 Magnum. They have even made some shotguns to include a very nice boxlock double. (Although discontinued in 1959, the Marlin Model 90 can still make a great upland game piece. Photo from 16-gauge World) Design These guns came about in 1936 when Sears asked Marlin to...
  15. The little known Marlin Model 200 crack barrel shotgun

    It a fit of growth before being acquired by Remington, in 2000 Marlin purchased the assets of H&R 1871, a Massachusetts-based firearms maker who had likewise made guns under the moniker of NEF for generations. This company, the largest manufacturer of single shot shotguns and rifles in the world, even made a Marlin branded shotgun for a brief period. Marlin's single shot background Known primarily for their rifles, Marlin Firearms of New Haven, Connecticut also sold a line of shotguns for...
Loading...