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  • Marlin's Faux 22 M1 Carbine, the Model 989M2

    Today the AR-15 series rifles are perhaps the most popular semi-auto firearms in the country. In the early 1960s, when the AR was still unknown, the go-to rifle for medium game hunting and home defense was the M1 Carbine. With this understood, Marlin went about creating a M1-ish carbine for small game hunters and plinkers. This gun we know today as the Model 989M2. Just what was the M1 anyway? Formally, the "United States Carbine, Caliber .30, M1," but commonly just referred to as the M1,...
  • The 22 Marlin Dragunov

    The Marlin Model 60 and its 22LR cousins such as the 75, 99, 990 and others, have been a staple of gunracks across the country for decades. However, some of us grow old of the standard walnut stocks and want to branch out into something more tactical. The ATI Fiberforce stock ATI, long known for their aftermarket gunstocks and accessories, introduced their Fiberforce stock for the classic Marlin Model 60 more than ten years ago. Retailing for $49 on their website, it is made of DuPont...
  • Keeping your Model 60 up and running

    The Marlin Model 60 tube-fed .22 semi-auto rifle is one of the most popular guns ever made. Between both the Marlin and Glenfield marked versions, there have been more than 11-million of these handy rimfires pushed out in the past half century. However, they do require a good bit of finesse to clean and maintain. As long as you can find the ammo for these bad boys today, these guns make great plinkers, but need to be maintained. (Photo: Marlin) Basic cleaning In all cleaning, make sure...
  • How short can you get? The pre-1934 Marlin SBRs

    In the 1930s, the wise members of Congress passed legislation that established the National Firearms Act, which regulated the civilian use and ownership of all the cool guns such as those, capable of full-auto fire, cane guns, pen guns, silencers, and short-barreled rifles. It is this last class that caught up a number of innocent Marlin lever guns in the dragnet. A rare Chilean police-marked Model 94 Marlin saddle ring trapper in .44-40 (with a 900-yard ladder sight!) and a super short...
  • The super 45.70: Marlin's .450M and the rifles that use it

    Facing its 15th birthday this year is the Hornady inspired and Marlin developed "modernized" .45-70 that is known far and wide as the .450 Marlin. This straight-walled bruiser, which is capable of providing a vehicle for bullets up to 500-grains in weight, is a new take on a big game cowboy guns. What is .450? Debuted at the year 2000 SHOT Show in Las Vegas, Hornady and Marlin introduced a round developed by ammo genius Mitch Mittelstaedt. Although similar to a .458 Win Mag (or its parent,...
  1. The super 45.70: Marlin's .450M and the rifles that use it

    Facing its 15th birthday this year is the Hornady inspired and Marlin developed "modernized" .45-70 that is known far and wide as the .450 Marlin. This straight-walled bruiser, which is capable of providing a vehicle for bullets up to 500-grains in weight, is a new take on a big game cowboy guns. What is .450? Debuted at the year 2000 SHOT Show in Las Vegas, Hornady and Marlin introduced a round developed by ammo genius Mitch Mittelstaedt. Although similar to a .458 Win Mag (or its parent,...
  2. Marlin's 375 North Haven Big Bore

    For a few brief years in the Reagan-era, Marlin ponied up a lever-action hunting rifle that was among the pinnacle in hard-hitting big game guns of its kind. Based on the same 1895 action proven over the course of a century, the new gun used a very old round that had similarly been reinvented. What is the .375 Win? Back in the 1880s, one of the most effective "cowboy" rounds was the big-bore .38-55 Winchester. This black powder fueled cartridge could send a 255-grain bullet out a couple...
  3. The Screaming hot Marlin 336SC Zipper of yesteryear

    If you are a predator or varmint hunter, odds are the thought of a 50-ish grain .22 caliber bullet with a velocity of over 3200 feet per second would get your attention. Well the thing is, the round itself has existed for almost a century as the .219 Zipper and furthermore, there is a classic JM rifle that chambered it and it's considered one of the "holy grails" of modern Marlin lever guns. What is the Zip? As explained by Gun Digest's Dan Sheeler, the .219 Zipper was birthed out into the...
  4. Marlin's Long Tom 120 scattergun

    For well over a century JM Marlin's firearms company made a line of pump action shotguns that got little attention when compared to their much more popular rifle line that both began the company and endure today. Among this flock of rare birds included the super groovy Model 120 with its optional forty-inch (40 inch) barrel. That is not a misprint. Marlin's pump line Starting in 1898 Marlin made its first slide or trombone action shotgun, the imaginatively named Model 1898. This remained...
  5. When Marlin went big bore: The Original Super Goose

    For just a brief but glorious time, Marlin gave the masses of water fowlers what could be considered one of the most popular bolt-action large caliber shotguns of its day-- the 34-inch barreled Model 5510. And yes, the "10" is the size of the gauge. The bolt-action Marlin burners Today the Marlin Firearms Company is best known for its line of rimfire plinkers and lever-action hunting rifles, but they also made shotguns for nearly a solid century. Between 1903-1954 they produced no less...
  6. The little known Marlin Model 200 crack barrel shotgun

    It a fit of growth before being acquired by Remington, in 2000 Marlin purchased the assets of H&R 1871, a Massachusetts-based firearms maker who had likewise made guns under the moniker of NEF for generations. This company, the largest manufacturer of single shot shotguns and rifles in the world, even made a Marlin branded shotgun for a brief period. Marlin's single shot background Known primarily for their rifles, Marlin Firearms of New Haven, Connecticut also sold a line of shotguns for...
  7. The mysterious and beautiful Marlin Ballard Pope Schuetzen rifles

    Back at the tail end of the 19th century, shooting sports societies centered on hyper accurate rifles were all the rage in polite society. It was during this time that many Marlin Ballard rifles became heavily modified for use in these events, and many picked up finely tuned Pope Barrels to produce the uber rare Marlin Ballard Pope Schuetzen rifle. Confused? Keep reading Serial #22268, 35-40, 32 3/4" No. 4 Marlin-Ballard Hartford Pope barrel #220 with a bright excellent bore. Sold for...
  8. The Gentleman's Friend: Marlin's Standard Pocket Wheelgun

    The Marlin Firearms Company started in New England as a maker of small, pocket-sized revolvers-- often constructed entirely by hand-- and only later moved into rifles and shotguns. One of their most iconic 19th Century designs was the Standard. Marlin origins John M. Marlin was born in Connecticut in 1836 and as a young man worked in the Colt Factory in Hartford. When Colt went near belly up after the Civil War, Marlin ventured out on his own and started making derringer-style pistols by...
  9. Marlins on the big screen

    When we saw that actor Chris Pratt, fresh of his movie success as Star Lord in Guardians of the Galaxy, is now rocking a Marlin 1895 SBL in .45-70 Government for his role as "Raptor Whisper" Owen Grady in the upcoming Jurassic World film (a rifle that we think goes great for velociraptor taming), we decided to look at some of the other Marlin screen roles out there. According to the good folks over at the Internet Media Firearms Database, who burn lean muscle tissue into the night analyzing...
  10. The rock and roll Marlin: the M1918 BAR

    Today each Army and Marine fire team contains at least one hard charger who is designated the squad automatic weapon man. This position, first conceived back in 1918, was until the disco era composed of a Joe or Leatherneck armed with a BAR. What's a BAR you ask? (A Marlin-Rockwell M1918 BAR, via Julia auctions) John Browning's trench sweeper Officially designated "Rifle, Caliber .30, Automatic, Browning, M1918," this 16-pound light machine gun was revolutionary when it was introduced in...
  11. The Marauder: Marlin's short-barreled cowboy gun

    While no one ever accused the Marlin 30 series lever action rifle of being too long in the field, the company has from time to time flirted with chopping it down even further. One of the shortest of these was the briefly made 336 Marauder. Isn't it cute? The basic platform Way back in 1893 one LL Hepburn, a gunsmith at Marlin, was issued patent number 502,489 for a new locking bolt system with a two-piece firing pin and rectangular bolt that could be actuated by an under-rifle lever...
  12. Marlin's Turn of the Century pump: The Model 19 shotgun

    Produced for a scant two-year period, the often-overlooked Marlin Model 19 was a scattergun with class that signaled the end of 19th century thinking and stepped boldly towards a modern design that we can appreciate today. Bloodlines A superb Marlin 1898 shotgun Starting in 1898 Marlin made its first slide or trombone action shotgun, the imaginatively named Model 1898. This remained in production for almost a decade when it was replaced by the "teen series" (M16 and 17) guns which gave...
  13. Setting up your rifle

    Once you have your rifle and scope picked out, you have other considerations to make and other options to take when it comes to outfitting the final package. -Stock Ideally, your rifle should fit you as perfectly as if it was made for you by the god of war and handed down via a procession of his imps who laid it gently at your feet. Unfortunately, unless you go to a custom rifle maker and have it made to spec you are most likely left with having to work with what you have. However, do not...
  14. Mount up! Saddle ring Marlin cowboy guns

    Harkening back to the good old "hell for leather" days of the U.S. cavalry, the saddle ring attachment on Marlin lever action rifles have been around for over a century and is still available (of sorts) today. Why the saddle ring? Close up of Marlin 1893 SRC .30-30 Win caliber saddle ring carbine via Collectors Arms European horse soldiers of the Napoleonic Wars often added a small carbine to their more traditional armament of saddle pistol, saber, heavy sword, and lance. At some point,...
  15. How short can you get? The pre-1934 Marlin SBRs

    In the 1930s, the wise members of Congress passed legislation that established the National Firearms Act, which regulated the civilian use and ownership of all the cool guns such as those, capable of full-auto fire, cane guns, pen guns, silencers, and short-barreled rifles. It is this last class that caught up a number of innocent Marlin lever guns in the dragnet. A rare Chilean police-marked Model 94 Marlin saddle ring trapper in .44-40 (with a 900-yard ladder sight!) and a super short...
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