Boyd's stock for Ruger American

Discussion in 'Gunsmithing' started by lingr, Feb 20, 2015.

  1. Tnarb

    Tnarb Member

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    Exactly what I needed to know. Thanks.
     
  2. Tnarb

    Tnarb Member

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    Well I got the blocks bedded and the treated action torqued in......praying it comes apart.....
     
    Last edited: Jun 25, 2015

  3. UglyBagofWaer

    UglyBagofWaer New Member

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    Love that bolt handle. Where'd you get that and make?
     
  4. roninwsnc

    roninwsnc Member

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    Hi Folks,

    Thank you for the great posts about epoxying the "V-Blocks" of an Ruger American Rifle into a Boyd's laminated stock. It is very helpful.

    Recently, I have been researching Boyd's Hardwood Rifle Stocks. I found several very good YouTube videos about Boyd's stocks for the Ruger American Rifle models. The laminated stocks look very cool. Most owners really liked their new stocks. Only one guy was not happy with the delivery time (as I recall, it took about 5 or 6 months for his stock to arrive).

    I finally decided to buy a Boyd's walnut stock for my .243 caliber Ruger American Predator Rifle last month. It arrived about two weeks later. The instruction sheet said to "dry assemble" the stock to see if everything fits and to call Boyd's customer service department if there is a problem. I tried to "dry assemble" the stock and receiver/barrel without forcing anything. Unfortunately, I have a "fitting" problem. I called Boyd's customer service department. They wanted me to send some pictures. I did. They wanted more pictures so I sent more (some side by side comparisons of the original stock versus the walnut stock). Later they wrote the following:

    It looks like you could have a different variation from what was ordered. I have included some measurements below for what you ordered. Please compare them to your original to determine if what you ordered is what you are needing.
    Barrel Dimensions: Point A = 1 1/64" and Point B = 3/4"
    Center to Center of Action Screws: 4 3/64"
    Over All Length of Part: 31 1/2"

    I had no idea where "Point A" or "Point B" are on the rifle barrel. I assumed Point B was close to the muzzle (my rifle's barrel is close to 3/4 inch in diameter at the muzzle), my rifle's center to center of actions screws is 4.044 inches which is about a difference of 0.002 to 0.003 inches. I suspect there is that much slop in the V-Blocks. My original plastic stock is about 2 inches shorter than the walnut stock (the extra length of the walnut stocks forearm is not a problem to me). I get the feeling I am getting the old run around.

    The real problem is that the inlet cut out for the trigger housing needs a little more wood removed. I only have a few hand tools and sand paper. Nevertheless, I think I could do the job with a triangle or rat tail file but that would void the 90 day warranty.

    I have uploaded a few these photos to Google. They mostly show my new Boyd's walnut stock and the trigger housing problem. The link to these pictures follows:

    http://goo.gl/photos/dMqUhfdorwdLHaa88

    I would appreciate your suggestions and comments.

    Thank You,
    Ron

     
  5. Gumpy

    Gumpy AKA Richard Prestage

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    Wow! Questionable customer service! Please keep us up on how it's handled. I've been considering buying from them a stock for a 8mm Mauser. In my opinion, and in most people, CS is a big part of any company.
     
  6. roninwsnc

    roninwsnc Member

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    Hi Folks,

    Thank you for all the suggestions and comments. I appreciate it.

    This is a follow up to my problem of fitting my Ruger American Predator Rifle to a Boyd’s stock.

    It is hard to put a square peg into a smaller round hole. So, I decided to break out my triangle and rat tail files and to carefully remove small amounts of wood from the half circular hole in the trigger inlet area and to eventually turn it into a rectangular hole. I wanted to keep as much wood as possible. So, I tested the fit of the trigger housing after each incremental wood reduction. I was pretty sure that the amount of wood to be removed would be much less than suggested by the comparable area of the original stock. I thought I would probably need to remove some wood from the left side of the trigger inlet area so the safety tang’s connection rod and mechanism would move freely, and maybe even a tiny bit of wood at the front to allow for the trigger tension screw.

    I have uploaded a few photos to Google. The link to these pictures follows:

    https://goo.gl/photos/smjj2Exv7ZwiyZMb7

    Thank you,
    Ron
     
  7. roninwsnc

    roninwsnc Member

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    Hi Folks,

    I finally got around to epoxying the V-Blocks into the factory supplied inlets for them. I was worried about getting them into the proper positions without the epoxy running into the various holes and parts of the rifle. I got a lot of good information about doing this job from YouTube tutorials. Thank you YouTube.

    The Boyd's stock was supposed to be walnut. The original stock had almost no visible grain or figuring. The most obvious were just barely noticeable near the end of the forearm and at the bottom of the pistol grip. The factory finish probably was hiding most of the features and flaws of the walnut stump or branch wood. So, I decided to remove the factory finish to see what was really there.

    Again I went to YouTube and reviewed how other folks have re-finished their wooden stocks. I used a water base paint stripper called “Lift Off” to soften up the factory’s final coat. I sanded the stock with 320 grit paper down to the surface of the wood. I used several applications of “Krud Kutter” to remove the soaked in stain. I flushed the "Krud Kutter" with lots of hot water. I let the stock had dried a few days. I applied three coats of “Tru-Oil” over a few more days. The "Tru-Oil" was very glossy. I tried to give the stock a satin finish by lightly rubbing it with very fine steel wool.

    Now… the underlying walnut grain and figuring are much more visible. Below is the link to a few photographs of the re-finished stock. Most of the close-up shots are slightly over exposed. This made the stock’s basic color a little lighter than it would normally appear. The photo of the complete stock is more typical of its basic color.

    LINK to photographs: https://goo.gl/photos/gY6oQ2jUQHyjWd6x9

    Thanks for all the suggestions,
    Ron
     
  8. Tnarb

    Tnarb Member

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    I'm gonna guess that is a lower grade walnut they use for "stock" stocks.
     
  9. sickmick

    sickmick New Member

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    Just to clarify......Boyd's website lists all of these dimensions and measuring points on the first page you see when clicking on any stock. I would suppose their hope is that you actually read it and confirm that you are ordering the correct stock before placing your order. I know I would confirm all measurements if I was ordering.

    So to me, it's not so much a matter of poor customer service..... but possibly not fully reading the information given before placing the order.

    Boyd's is a great company and I'd never hesitate to buy from them. They are most definitely not lacking in customer service IMO.
     
  10. NMdoghunter

    NMdoghunter New Member

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    Just purchased a boyds stock for my Ruger American long action 30-06. Just wanted to see if there was any update on how the rifles shoot with the bedded v blocks?

    Any more photos on bedded v blocks?

    Anybody tried bedding the entire action or would this be unnecessary?

    Great thread, I know it is old, but it has helped me a ton.