Bucks or Does ??

Discussion in 'Hunting Forum' started by SWO1, Oct 14, 2012.

  1. SWO1

    SWO1 Well-Known Member Lifetime Supporting

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    A good rule, told to me when I started deer hunting, but of course I violated right off and learned the lesson well.

    When you shoot a deer it may drop on the spot, drop and then get back up and run off, or just run off. DONT APPROACH, FOLLOW OR PURSUE it right away. Just sit still and WAIT. Once wounded although fatally, if pressured or persued they can run for miles before finally dying. If left alone they will almost always go a short distance, drop or lay down and die. If you have done your part, placed the bullet in the right spot, and used the correct bullet there will be a blood trail to follow or find them in a short distance. I always wait at least 15-30 minutes even tho mine are shot thru the head/neck and drop where they were standing.

    The first big buck my youngest shot was heart shot. I was watching and saw it bow up, wheel around, take 2 short bounds and collapse. I could see it laying in the leaves just a few feet out of the clearing but Cameron could not. And with the recoil he did not see where he went or him going down. It happens in less than a second. After the shot I asked him....Did you hit him ? He said...I was holding right where you told me to. I know I did. I then said, well then where is he ? He looked all over the clearing and this dejected look came over his face, and he kind of mumbled, I know I hit him. He then wanted to go right down and look for him. Even tho I knew the deer lay dear just out of sight, to teach him the lesson I said NO. Sit right here. Im gonna have another cup of coffee, you have some more hot choclate. After about 20 minutes I told him we would go down and check out the area. He climbed down first, leaving his rife in the Stand. I brought the gun down with me and told him he better take it as the deer may be down but not dead and may have to be finished off. As we approached the spot about 80 out I stopped him and asked where did you shot him at. He said I dont remember. I told him you have to remember to know where to start looking for a blood trail. I then showed him the spot and there was NO BLOOD. I then told him since he didnt know which way he ran off to start making concentric circles, getting wider from that spot looking for blood. Of cource after about 2 steps he spotted him laying just 15 feet away. He started to run over to him. I stopped him and told him NEVER approach a large animal down. He may not be dead. He could jump up. Look at that rack (he was a 10 pointer) He could put a hurtin on you. Get yourself a stick and prod him from a distance, from the back. He picked up a limb about 2 ft long and poked him in the rear flank. I laughed and said, no, no...get a longer one, about 8-10 ft. get behind his head and just lay it on his eye. He then said, grandpa, his tounge is hanging out....HES DEAD. And he was.

    Every deer since then both grandsons have went thru the same routine, even tho like me they shoot them in the head or neck and they drop like a bad habit.
     
  2. greyhawk50

    greyhawk50 Well-Known Member

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    SWO1, very good advise.
    Don't remember what year but I was hunting Pa. with a 10" T/C Contender 30-30. A small buck approached heading right to left at about 40 yards. I was nestled in a pile of downed limbs and was well hidden. Resting the pistol across a limb, I let off a shot. I knew immediately that I had pulled the shot and shot too far back. The deer bolted. I was so mad at myself because I knew better. :mad:
    I waited about 5 minutes and then heard a shot from the direction that he had gone. I just knew that another hunter had taken that buck. Then I really didn't know what to do. As I waited and thought it over, I decided to follow the tracks to the deer and help the successful hunter drag him out. About 20 minutes had passed and I started that way. As I walked slowly up the ridge, something to my right caught my eye. I slowly turned my head to see the buck that I had gut shot. He had lain down but was still alive. I took 2 more slow steps as I raised the Contender & pressed off a shot - right through both front shoulders. Never did find out what the other shot was all about. Moral is, always confirm after a shot.
    The underlined text reminded me of a hunting tip. When you see your first few deer, make a mental note as to their color. It is often slightly different than any other color in the woods. That will help you spot them when they don't want to be seen. Also, in heavy woods, look for part of a deer. Not the whole animal. Maybe an eye or an ear. And for sure, look for any horizontal lines i.e. the back or stomach. Most lines in the woods are vertical.
     

  3. SWO1

    SWO1 Well-Known Member Lifetime Supporting

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    greyhawk, your comments on spotting deer are Right On. One of the hardest things was to teach my grandsons HOW TO LOOK FOR DEER. We hunt the timber and brush. Explaining to them how to look/scan at a fairly large area without staring at exact spots was hard. It took a while for them to comprehend. As you said, look for movement, twitch of an ear, tail, head movement. Yes you do stay busy checking out birds, leafs blowing in the wind, squirrels, ect. Also light and shadow changes as the sun tracks across the sky, even on cloudy days. The same area will look different as the day progresses.

    Your observations on colors and geometric lines is great. You would make a Great Student for the Camo and Consealment Class at the Marine Corps Sniper School.....:D Most have wrong ideas on how camo works. If you dont think a Grey and white deer is invisible, and I have done this many times, while just out observing, I had probley 6-8 deer feeding on acorns not more than 50 yards from me. they were more or less in the open on a background of trees with no leaves, ground covered with downed leaves of brown, gold, yellow, and red. Once picked up they stood out like a sore thumb. I then swiveld around and looked away for maybe a minute. and looking back they had disappeared !! No they wernt gone, stilll there, but had melted away into the terrain. Until they flicked an ear or tail, moved their head I couldnt see them. They are masters at it.....:eek: Again last week as two deer were within 20 yards of my blind, one stepped out of the clearing just ONE STEP into the low brush, again no leaves. I never took my eyes off it and I KNEW WHERE IT WAS but if it wasnt for its head being sillouited against an open patch of sky IT WAS GONE !!
     
  4. SWO1

    SWO1 Well-Known Member Lifetime Supporting

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    If you think spending time in the Woods is QUITE time....think again. The timber is NOISY. A constant din of insects, birds, and other animals. After settleing in it takes about 30 minutes for the critters to adjust to your intrusion and resume their non-stop rackett. Learn to identify the sounds and patterns and you will be more sucessful in your hunts.

    Squirrels - I love the little fur balls. They are great alarms. Learn to identify their different calls. Hard to explain, look them up, there is audio tracts to help you. The most effective one is the Alarm call. Rocky dosnt like intruders in his territory. On something approaching he sounds his angry alarm call. Learn this sound and you will know SOMETHING is approaching, could be another Squirrel, a Turkey, Coyote.....OR DEER.

    Crows - Feeding crows are another noisy bunch. Lots of animals migrate to them knowing they keep a sharp look out for preditors and will scatter when disturbed. Hearing them throw up a loud corus of CAWS will indicate approaching compatition for their food. Another indication of something else in the area.

    Woodpeckers - Here in SW Missouri we have the Red Headed Philliated variety. The males are big,with flaming red heads, females are a lot smaller and mostly brown. The Males emitt a loud, almost laugh like alarm call when disturbed.

    And of course Deer sounds. Antler rattling, Tree scrapping, Buck Snorts, wheezes, caughs, Doe Blets, and a Doe mating whine. Again all these can be googled so you can hear them.

    Watch, and just as important...LISTEN
     
  5. hombre243

    hombre243 Well-Known Member

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    Good advice SW01

    Getting the game is only part of the game...hunting safety and hunter safety is Number 1 on my list of things to bring up today. SWO1, I apologize for butting in but I just found a very important article and I want to introduce it in this forum so everyone knows what to look for. The new thread will be the name of the article..."Nine Days in November." My friend was mentioned in the small game thread, I think. This article starts off telling about his tragedy. The quality is rather poor but it is all I could dredge up.
    Thanks
    h243
     
  6. SWO1

    SWO1 Well-Known Member Lifetime Supporting

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    Goes right along with this thread hombre.....Should be #1 priority on EVERYONES list. Thanks. Cant review this stuff to much, from new hunters to us old geezers......:cool:
     
  7. hombre243

    hombre243 Well-Known Member

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    having trouble with the image

    I cut the original out of an Outdoor life mag in '85 and it has not weathered the weather so pretty good. I have to put it off a bit because I have to finish packing. Maybe tonite I can get a viewable image.
     
  8. 1894

    1894 Well-Known Member

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    This is a GREAT thread !!!
     
  9. hombre243

    hombre243 Well-Known Member

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    Nine Days in November

    If at first you dont succeed...keep succing.

    These images are JPG. I tried to do PDF's but they were too large and the system would not accept them.

    I copied them to the desktop or saved them there then opened them, and zoomed until I could read the article. Best I can do...please let me know if you cannot read them. I can email the pdf's to you.

    Thanks
    h243.

    PS Everyone...PLEASE be safe out there. I have lost 1 friend and I do not want to lose another.
     

    Attached Files:

  10. SWO1

    SWO1 Well-Known Member Lifetime Supporting

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    Im gonna go put some of this to practice. Will take a hike to the Turkey blind for a few hours. After they paraded by me on the porch yesterday maybe I can get lucky. Then have to cut the front field this afternoon. Finished the Boss's honey dew list yesterday so Im good to go today.,

    Later.....Frank
     
  11. Windy

    Windy Well-Known Member Supporting

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    Seriously? They crawl? They know to hide their antlers?

    Isn't that a mountain lion........not a coyote?
     
  12. SWO1

    SWO1 Well-Known Member Lifetime Supporting

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    Alright grey....no personnel attacks now......:) I must be an "Exception To the Rule".......................:D
     
  13. greyhawk50

    greyhawk50 Well-Known Member

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    Q1; Yes they crawl & Yes, I believe they do hide their antlers. Although I've been known to be wrong on occasion. ;)

    Q2; Yes, that is a mountain lion.... not a coyote.

    I should have inserted a blank line to indicate that my subject matter changed.

    Sometimes, my mind is like a laser beam in a room full of mirrors. :rolleyes:

    But then again, I'm not as young as I used to be.
     
  14. greyhawk50

    greyhawk50 Well-Known Member

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    YES, I believe that you are, but maybe not for that reason. ;)
     
  15. SWO1

    SWO1 Well-Known Member Lifetime Supporting

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    Stayed for 3 hours .... nothing. But I did hear a lot. Wish I had a GOOD camera with audio. Could give a real life example of sounds while hunting.

    Heard the Woodpecker let loose down the botton of the draw to the North. A few minutes later Squirrell started barking closer up the draw. Then after a few minutes another Squirrell put up a protest closer yet just to the east. After that.....NOTHING. Not a thing showed up. As it goes most of the time. But you have to get primed and alert. Was there something there, most likley, just didnt wonder into my view. Knowing what was beyond my vision in those directions, it probley was following a lane that runs along a cross fence. It would have had to cross 3 well used game trails that all intercect the opening I was setup on.