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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
My m44 still has cosmoline in it. I was checking the rifling and I could smell cosmoline in the chamber. I'm going to get it out of there later this week. Anybody have suggestions on how to do it. I'm thinking about using dad's heat gun and melting that crap out.
 

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Clean the chamber and bore real good, shoot the hell out of it to get it good and hot and melt the cozy...clean it it again....repeat
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Clean the chamber and bore real good, shoot the hell out of it to get it good and hot and melt the cozy...clean it it again....repeat
That's what's wrong with it. When I load a round it's hard to get the bolt to close. When I do get it closed and shoot, it ejects the spent shell just fine. Wtf!!!!
 

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This might help !
Taken from Wikipedia

Aging, solidification, removal

Cosmoline that is fairly fresh, or that has been hermetically sealed in a plastic bag or shrink wrap, remains a grease-like viscous fluid, and mostly wipes off with a rag, leaving only a thin film behind. Cosmoline that is older and has had air exposure usually solidifies after a few years, as the volatile hydrocarbon fraction evaporates and leaves behind only the waxy hydrocarbon fraction. The solid wax does not readily wipe off. It can be scraped off, although the scraping is laborious and leaves crumbs to be swept or vacuumed away. A useful method of cleaning a tool of crusted cosmoline is to allow a penetrating oil (such as WD-40, CRC 5-56, CLP, or equivalent) to soak into it for several minutes or hours, which typically restores it to a viscous-fluid state, allowing it to be wiped off. An additional method of cosmoline removal on new parts is to use a closed-cabinet parts washer that utilizes the power wash process. Removal of cosmoline with an aqueous parts washer requires high heat, the proper aqueous detergent, and the correct hydraulic impact pressure. Most of these "washing" methods will create a difficult-to-dispose-of toxic sludge.


Cheers
Bucky
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
This might help !
Taken from Wikipedia

Aging, solidification, removal

Cosmoline that is fairly fresh, or that has been hermetically sealed in a plastic bag or shrink wrap, remains a grease-like viscous fluid, and mostly wipes off with a rag, leaving only a thin film behind. Cosmoline that is older and has had air exposure usually solidifies after a few years, as the volatile hydrocarbon fraction evaporates and leaves behind only the waxy hydrocarbon fraction. The solid wax does not readily wipe off. It can be scraped off, although the scraping is laborious and leaves crumbs to be swept or vacuumed away. A useful method of cleaning a tool of crusted cosmoline is to allow a penetrating oil (such as WD-40, CRC 5-56, CLP, or equivalent) to soak into it for several minutes or hours, which typically restores it to a viscous-fluid state, allowing it to be wiped off. An additional method of cosmoline removal on new parts is to use a closed-cabinet parts washer that utilizes the power wash process. Removal of cosmoline with an aqueous parts washer requires high heat, the proper aqueous detergent, and the correct hydraulic impact pressure. Most of these "washing" methods will create a difficult-to-dispose-of toxic sludge.


Cheers
Bucky
In English please
 

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Clean it real well of all the cosmoline you can see then chuck a large bore brush saturated with Hoppes on a section of cleaning rod into a drill. Scrub the receiver area real well with the brush being sure to get into all the nooks and crannies. Will work wonders on a sticky bolt.
 

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Murph41

I was a little bit "buggered up", with the word Cosmoline, so I thought I would look it up with Wikipedia.

I too am more confused.
Hehehehehe !
 
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