Glenfield 60 Squirrel restore has begun!!!

Discussion in 'Marlin Rimfires' started by Spud9, Nov 3, 2012.

  1. bob2231

    bob2231 Active Member

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    It's too bad about the mag. tube,I have a spare,but it's short.
    It probably wouldn't get there without being crushed in shipping anyway.
     
  2. Spud9

    Spud9 Well-Known Member

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    I have three other Glenfield 60's waiting to be worked on, So I will probably pull the tube off one of them, blue it and use it instead. We will see. I really wanted to use all the original parts but if I try and get the pitting out it will make the tube too thin. There is always Numrich or the pawn shops...
     

  3. storm

    storm Well-Known Member

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    VERY nice, Spud. I might just have to send my bolt down to you in order to get you to jewel it! I don't have the first idea how to achieve a look like that (I've tried once or twice, but it always came out looking like poo)
     
  4. Spud9

    Spud9 Well-Known Member

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    Looking like POO?!!! Was a child in the room while you were typing or does the wife have a cuss jar and you didn't want to put in a $1? Send it to me and I will make it nicey nice.....
     
  5. storm

    storm Well-Known Member

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    No, I just didn't want to teach any kid reading the thread his first naughty word ;)

    I can have the bolt out to you sometime in the next couple weeks (the holidays are a bit hectic with family all over the state and in 3 other states besides). I very much appreciate it.

    I guess there's a trick to it? I tried using very high grit sandpaper on the end of a dowel after polishing, but I couldn't get it to come out well.
     
  6. Spud9

    Spud9 Well-Known Member

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    Actually this is what you need to do it right.
    http://www.brownells.com/gunsmith-t...ls-accessories/damascening-tool-prod8870.aspx

    or you can use small wire brushes and lapping compoud. It takes some practice to get the pattern right and using a sliding vise is helpful. If you get a damenscing tool practice on a scrap piece of steel or aluminum. It is all about pressure and time. Like I said, practice...... or send it to me after the holidays....
     
  7. Hyphenated

    Hyphenated Well-Known Member

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  8. storm

    storm Well-Known Member

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    Yea.... I think you should expect a package from me sometime in the next little while lol ...
     
  9. venturer

    venturer Member

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    Got mine out yesterday and did some plinking. Still dead on and some commens from others about how good it still looked. haven't shot it sense last year when I had to prove it against my sons 10/22.
     
  10. hombre243

    hombre243 Well-Known Member

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    Quick question...need elaborate answer. Or at least understandable.

    How is a gun such as the Model 60 with a squirrel checkering design evaluated. My friend here has one in decent shape but not perfect. It needs cleaning. Wood finish is ok, no scratches but dull with age. He would like to know (roundhouse figure) how much is it worth?
     
  11. Spud9

    Spud9 Well-Known Member

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    Ok, as you described the gun, in firing condition in need of a little TLC, a fair price would be between $100 and $125, less if rust or pitting is present. In mint condition you might see around $150. Condition is everything... and that price would be high retail/resell. A pawn shop might offer you $40 to $50 for it, $60 if you are lucky.
    Here is the thing.... Glenfield/Marlin 60's are not considered collectible (except to those that like them). The Glenfield 60 with the squirrel is a little more sought after than a plain Jane Marlin 60. It also depends on what year it was made. The older style might go for a couple $ more than the newer style but there are still alot of them out there and again, condition. The one I just finished I will eventually attempt to sell it for around $300 (that is what my asking price will be and only becasue it is a one off.), but I know I may not see that much. If I were to have given this gun to someone to do all that I did to it, the work would have run cost around $400 to $500. (at least that is what I would charge someone at my shop, for - {refinish stock, trigger job to 4 lbs and complete cleaning and polishing of trigger group, clean blast, remove pitting, sand and duracoat receiver, trigger guard, sights and sling mount, accurize, polish and jewel bolt, (along with removing, cleaning polishing and replacing ejectors and firing pin), sanding and grinding out pits on barrel then bluing it and the feed tube.}

    I hope this answers your question, or at least helps.
     
    Last edited: Nov 21, 2012
  12. hombre243

    hombre243 Well-Known Member

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    Excellent answer

    Thanks Spud,
    I will relay the info. I will post it here if he decides to sell it. But, I will have to check out a heavy rust spot on the barrel, and if he will let me, remove the barrel and action from the stock to look for more rust. I think he will probably keep it due to the non-collector status. It isn't worth as much as he hoped.
     
  13. Spud9

    Spud9 Well-Known Member

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    If I were him I would keep it and make it a project gun. Spend some time to disassemble, learn the gun then clean it up and make it his own. They are great firing guns and if he has or will have kids one day to pass it on. Great trainer for the little ones. Who know, in another 50 or 100 years it will be worth something.
    Use this info to find out when it was made.


    Marlin Year of Manufacture

    Marlin year of manufacture maybe determined from the following list of letter/numeral prefixs to the serial number; this coding only applies to serialized rifles:

    1946-C
    1947-D
    1948-E
    1949-F
    1950-G
    1951-H
    1952-J
    1953-K
    1954-L
    1955-M
    1956-N
    1957-P
    1958-R
    1959-S
    1960 (August)-1961-U
    1961 (August)-1962-V
    1963-W
    1964-Y,-Z
    1965-AA
    1966-AB
    1967-AC
    1968-AD, -68
    1969-69
    1970-70
    1971-71
    1972-72

    Starting in 1973, the year of manufacture maybe determined by subtracting the first two digits of the serial number from 100:
    Example: SN 2512345 would have been made in 1975 [100 - 25 = 75] and SN 94365295 would have been made in 2006 [ 100 - 94 = 06 (2006) ].

    For Marlin Rimfire Rifles [non-serialized]:

    From 1962 thru 1968 Marlins rimfire rifles (other than the 39 series lever actions) used a two letter date code that was stamped on the barrel. This date code is different than the one already listed, as Marlin rimfire rifles (other than the model 39 series) did not have a serial numbers until required to by Law after 1968. The first letter of the date code represented the month of manufacture while the second letter indicated the year. This date code was usually stamped on the left side of the barrel just in front of the receiver. The first letter of the date code is as follows:

    A = Jan.
    B = Feb.
    C = Mar.
    D = Apr.
    E = May
    F = June
    G = July
    H = Aug.
    I = Sep.
    J = Oct.
    K = Nov.
    L = Dec.

    The second letter of the date code is as follows:

    F = 1962
    G = 1963
    H = 1964
    I = 1965
    J = 1966
    K = 1967
    L = 1968

    So a date code of "JK" would in and SN 94365295 would have been made in 2006 [ 100 - 94 = 06 (2006) ].

    For Marlin Rimfire Rifles [non-serialized]:

    From 1962 thru 1968 Marlins rimfire rifles (other than the 39 series lever actions) used a two letter date code that was stamped on the barrel. This date code is different than the one already listed, as Marlin rimfire rifles (other than the model 39 series) did not have a serial numbers until required to by Law after 1968. The first letter of the date code represented the month of manufacture while the second letter indicated the year. This date code was usually stamped on the left side of the barrel just in front of the receiver. The first letter of the date code is as follows:

    A = Jan.
    B = Feb.
    C = Mar.
    D = Apr.
    E = May
    F = June
    G = July
    H = Aug.
    I = Sep.
    J = Oct.
    K = Nov.
    L = Dec.

    The second letter of the date code is as follows:

    F = 1962
    G = 1963
    H = 1964
    I = 1965
    J = 1966
    K = 1967
    L = 1968

    So a date code of "JK" would indicate that rifle was made in October of 1967.
     
  14. hombre243

    hombre243 Well-Known Member

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    Thanks Spud. I printed it all out and gave it to my friend, and saved a copy for myself.
     
  15. bob2231

    bob2231 Active Member

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    As far as values,when I combined my 2 into 1,I decided to use than plain stock rather than the squirrel because I don't want to bang up the original stock.The original will always be worth more because of its condition.I didn't want to ruin that on a "beater".