Marlin Model 60 problem

Discussion in 'Marlin Rimfires' started by lingr, Nov 25, 2012.

  1. lingr

    lingr Well-Known Member

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    Hello. I bought a new model 60 a month ago. Shot a couple of magazines of ammo through it with no problems. Then it started to jam and not ejecting the shells. Noticed that firing pin was hitting so far on the edge of the cartridges that it was splitting the cases on the side. Took it apart and cleaned but still doing it. Any ideas on what I can do?
     
  2. storm

    storm Well-Known Member

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    Post a close up photos of the bolt and some of the damaged cartridges - It might help diagnose the problem.

    It sounds to me like a chipped firing pin, or maybe debris inside the firing pin channel, but without seeing what you're working with it's hard to say. A photo of the breech/chamber would also help - you could have peening on the breech around the chamber -

    Have you dry fired the rifle a lot?
     

  3. lingr

    lingr Well-Known Member

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    These are the pics. I only dry fired it a couple if times after cleaning and putting it back together. At first I thought it was the ammo, Remington Thunderbolts. Tried to shoot some Federals through it, but they all misfired.
     

    Attached Files:

  4. storm

    storm Well-Known Member

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    Well, your firing pin looks ok, but I do see a good bit of peening at the bottom of the chamber. That's what the mark is at the bottom there.

    Did you buy the gun new or used?

    If you bought it new, I would contact Marlin/Remington and see about warranty replacement. If you bought it used, you're looking at having it worked on to have the peening removed. It looks like that's what's causing your problems.
     
  5. SHOOTER13

    SHOOTER13 RETIRED MODERATOR Lifetime Supporting

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    Welcome to the Marlin Firerms Forum lingr !!

    +1 on what storm has said...I can see where the chamber has been peened.

    Either totally disassemble and replace the firing pin or see a gunsmith.

    Let us know how you make out...
     
  6. lingr

    lingr Well-Known Member

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    Bought it new from Walmart month ago. So you think the firing pin is not hitting too low on the cartridges? Or just the peening that needs to be dealt with? Gonna contact Marlin next week about warranty on it. Thanks to all for the advice. This is a cool site.
     
  7. FOUR4D4

    FOUR4D4 Moderator Moderator

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    I dont have a model 60 but im sure one of our member will chime in soon
    Welcome to the Forum
     
  8. storm

    storm Well-Known Member

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    It isn't hitting too low - there's a reason they're called rimfires - what it IS doing though, is hitting too hard - either due to the peening caused by dry firing or due to a slightly too long firing pin. If it were mine, I'd get rid of the peening (several methods, some more labor and time intensive than others) and see how that does - if the problem persists, then I'd trim a thousandth off the end of the firing pin, but that's me - I've got a fair bit of experience with these guns, and with gunsmithing in general. Don't try to do anything you're not comfortable doing, and since it's under warranty, I'd say stick with contacting Marlin to see what they say first.

    Where are you located? If you're local to me (NW Florida) and Marlin won't or can't help, let me know and I might be able to help.
     
  9. lingr

    lingr Well-Known Member

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    Thanks storm. Guessing I'm probably 8-10 hrs away from you ( NE MS). Definitely not comfortable trying this repair myself. All I've ever done is keep guns cleaned and shoot em. If Marlin can't or won't help, I think there is a local gunsmith I can take it to. I'll let you know what Marlin says. Thank you again for the time and advice.
     
  10. Spud9

    Spud9 Well-Known Member

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    +1 Storm. I don't see why Marlin wouldn't take care of it. Let's see how Remlin CS is.
     
  11. lingr

    lingr Well-Known Member

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    Just was gonna let you y'all know that I didn't have any trouble sending the firearm back Marlin for repair. Sent it off prepaid by Marlin two weeks ago, got an e-mail today that the repairs has been made and had been shipped back. Will let you know how it works when I get it.
     
  12. lingr

    lingr Well-Known Member

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    Got the gun back from Marlin yesterday. Service report said they polished the chamber and replaced the bolt. Took it out today for a test fire, everything seems to working fine with it now. Was very impressed with service. Turn around time was a total of three weeks, and they paid shipping both ways also. Like this gun a lot!!!!
     
  13. Gumpy

    Gumpy AKA Richard Prestage

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    Thats good to hear!
     
  14. storm

    storm Well-Known Member

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    Glad to hear things got worked out!
     
  15. Spud9

    Spud9 Well-Known Member

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    Awesome report. Glad to hear they did good by you. Now go shoot the heck out of that thing.
     
  16. panama1

    panama1 New Member

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    As a side note, it is not good to dry fire any rim fire weapons.

    Best Panama.
     
  17. dayid

    dayid Member

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    Wrong. This is a misnomer from the past which still rears its ugly head occasionally.

    Most modern rimfires have forward-stops which stop the overtravel of the firing pin, which restricts it from actually hitting the breech, which is why very-old rimfires could eventually deform the breech face or break a firing pin upon too much dry fire. While there are some modern rimfires that should not be frequently dry-fired, they are few and far between.

    The Marlin Model 60 - being relative to this thread - features such a stop, and dry-fire will cause no harm as the firing pin still has a slight clearance before contacting the breech.

    [​IMG]
    Image showing different types of firing pins. The top two styles have both been used on Marlin Model 60s. Both prevent too much forward travel from the firing pin striking the barrel.
     
  18. Gumpy

    Gumpy AKA Richard Prestage

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    That's cool to know! I haven't heard that before!
     
  19. mrwintr

    mrwintr Active Member

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    I own a Model 60 and it has lots of issues in its ability to fire correctly from one day to the next...I have resolved most of its problems by swapping out different bolts and firing pins, etc. As I worked on this thing I realized that Marlin does not hold very tight tolerances, in fact I would consider them mass produced junk, so the idea that they could hold a tolerance tight enough to stop the firing pin from hitting the edge of the chamber really doesn't sound possible to me...not with Marlin anyway. I would stick to the thought that there is nothing good going to come from dry firing your rimfires....
     
  20. dayid

    dayid Member

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    Dry-firing any weapon is excellent practice. Many manufacturers encourage it for users to become more familiar with their firearms. Professional shooters will dry-fire many times more than they live-fire.

    I'll let your rude comments about the "junk" that this forum is devoted to slide, and allow others to judge it as they see fit.