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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Here's my Springfield Armory M1 Garand...manufactured in November 1944. She is pictured with an original M1942 16" bayonet ( very rare...most were cut down to 10" ) and a repo M7 fragmentation grenade launcher.




The M1 Garand (officially designated as United States Rifle, Caliber .30, M1), was the first semi automatic to be generally issued to the infantry of any nation. Called "the greatest battle implement ever devised" by General George S. Patton, the Garand officially replaced the bolt action M1903 Springfield as the standard service rifle of the United States Armed Forces in 1936 and was subsequently replaced by the selective fire M14 in 1957.
 

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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
Pictured below is my P38 built by Spreewerke GmbH, Metallwarenfabrik, in Berlin/Spandau Germany in 1942 during the second World War. The Spreewerke inspection stamp consisted of an eagle above the number 88 (E/88), but the first 500 weapons made at the Spreewerke factory had Walther inspection stamps which consisted of an eagle over 359 (E/359) . (My specimen has a serial number of 246 and the Walther acceptance stamp E/359). The letters CYQ are the code used to designate construction at the Spreewerke plant, which produced around 285,000 units by the wars end. This specimen is also Wehrmacht stamped with an Nazi eagle over swaztika. The P38 is chambered for 9mm Parabellum and holds 8 rounds in the magazine. She also came with a black semi-hard leather holster that holds an extra magazine.

 

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That is a sharp P-38. Always wanted one of those, but------:(
That one is very clean considering it's 70 years old.
Congrats!!!
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 · (Edited)
Yes sir...after almost 4 decades of collecting and shooting, I have two American Security BF ( Burglary/Fire ) series safes full of my favorite pastime !!

 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Here's a nice Cold War relic from the year 1961...an East German Makarov chambered in 9x18mm.



The Pistol Makarov (PM) is a medium-size, straight blowback action, frame-fixed barrel handgun. In blowback designs, the only force holding the slide closed is that of the recoil spring; upon firing, the barrel and slide do not have to unlock, as do locked-breech design pistols. Blowback designs are simple and more accurate than designs using a recoiling, tilting, or articulated barrel, but they are limited practically by the weight of the slide. The 9x18mm cartridge is a practical cartridge in blowback-operated pistols; producing a respectable level of energy from a gun of moderate weight and size. The PM is heavy for its size by modern US commercial handgun standards, largely because in a blowback pistol the heavy slide provides greater inertia to delay opening of the breech until internal pressures have fallen to a safe level. Other, more powerful cartridges have been used in blowback pistol designs, but the Makarov is widely regarded as particularly well balanced in its design elements.
 

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you got some really nice guns in your collection shooter! i really liking the M1 Garand! i have always liked shooting them, and hope to find one at a reasonable price one day. one day i hope to add one to the collection! the P-38 in nice too. now you need a Luger!
 

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Hey I'm doing a Mauser project and ready to buy a barrel. Any advice to offer on these three options. 22-250Rem, 243Win, and 25-06Rem. I'm looking for something mainly for fun that will shoot FLAT. Being deer legal is a plus, so the 22 is likely out.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Well, lets see...

22-250 Remington

It is particularly popular in the western states of the USA where high winds often hinder the effectiveness of other varmint rounds in prairie dog hunting. Many states in the US have minimum caliber restrictions limiting the use of this cartridge on larger game such as deer, although some states do allow the cartridge to be used for big game.With bullet weights in the 40 to 65 grain range, I wouldn't use it for deer.

.243 Winchester

Now perceived as the entry-level caliber for legal deer hunting...this cartridge is a winner due to it's numerous loadings utilizing bullet weights from 55 grain to 105 grain and beyond. Recoil isn't bad in a hunting rifle ( Mauser ) configuration.

25-06 Remington

With deer dropping bullet weights ranging above 100 grains, this offspring of the 30-06 Springfield in it's 175 grain version will drop anything that walks on the North American continent. The recoil on this cartridge is it's only weakness...manageable, but not for everyone.

I would give the nod to the .243 Win, due to it's versatility, bullet weight range, and the fact it will do the job on a 250 lbs. deer quite nicely.

That's my 2 cents...I'm sure others might chime in. Make sure you let us know what you decide.
 

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Well, lets see...

22-250 Remington

It is particularly popular in the western states of the USA where high winds often hinder the effectiveness of other varmint rounds in prairie dog hunting. Many states in the US have minimum caliber restrictions limiting the use of this cartridge on larger game such as deer, although some states do allow the cartridge to be used for big game.With bullet weights in the 40 to 65 grain range, I wouldn't use it for deer.

.243 Winchester

Now perceived as the entry-level caliber for legal deer hunting...this cartridge is a winner due to it's numerous loadings utilizing bullet weights from 55 grain to 105 grain and beyond. Recoil isn't bad in a hunting rifle ( Mauser ) configuration.

25-06 Remington

With deer dropping bullet weights ranging above 100 grains, this offspring of the 30-06 Springfield in it's 175 grain version will drop anything that walks on the North American continent. The recoil on this cartridge is it's only weakness...manageable, but not for everyone.

I would give the nod to the .243 Win, due to it's versatility, bullet weight range, and the fact it will do the job on a 250 lbs. deer quite nicely.

That's my 2 cents...I'm sure others might chime in. Make sure you let us know what you decide.
Thanks for the response. I'm leaning towards the 25 cal because bullet weights go above 100gr while maintaining 3800fps. I have owned a 30-06 and in fact this gun is it's replacement, so I know the recoil issue. I'll likely trim the barrel to 20" (down from 24") as I prefer a carbine length gun. But the 243 is still in the running because I have some experience with it, and it will do the trick.
 

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Thanks for the response. I'm leaning towards the 25 cal because bullet weights go above 100gr while maintaining 3800fps. I have owned a 30-06 and in fact this gun is it's replacement, so I know the recoil issue. I'll likely trim the barrel to 20" (down from 24") as I prefer a carbine length gun. But the 243 is still in the running because I have some experience with it, and it will do the trick.
duster, the 25 calibers are a good intermediate caliber, and like the 6mm/243's, very versatile. loaded down, very good varmint caliber, loaded up, very good deer sized game caliber. my favorite, the 25-06. another of my favorites is the 257 Roberts, which is and excellent 25 caliber cartridge in it's own right. the 257 Roberts loaded with good 140-150gr bullets will drop a deer like it got hit with a sledgehammer! i own a Marlin XL7 in 25-06 and it's great shooting rifle.
 

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Hey duster, i just picked up a 1915 danzig custom 8mm. The bore is perfect so i'm going to keep it 8mm and see how it shoots.I agree with shooter of the calibers you listed 243 would be my choice, but if i ever changed my barrel i would go with 6.5x55 i really like that round and if you want you can still get surplus. It is a very accurate round and works well with the mauser action. Good luck with whatever you chose. OMT"
 

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Here's my Springfield Armory M1 Garand...manufactured in November 1944. She is pictured with an original M1942 16" bayonet ( very rare...most were cut down to 10" ) and a repo M7 fragmentation grenade launcher.




The M1 Garand (officially designated as United States Rifle, Caliber .30, M1), was the first semi automatic to be generally issued to the infantry of any nation. Called "the greatest battle implement ever devised" by General George S. Patton, the Garand officially replaced the bolt action M1903 Springfield as the standard servive rifle of the United States Armed Forces in 1936 and was subsequently replaced by the selective fire M14 in 1957.
I'm jealous i always wanted a garand, thats a beauty" I also owned a 1941 P-38 A/C sold it many yrs ago for $200, Kick, Kick" Nice guns OMT"
 

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My WWII Military Rifles

My Mosin Nagant 7.62X54 was made in Russia in 1934 and has the
Octagon receiver. Just recently bought it and shot it for the first time
today. It appears to have never been issued for warfare.
My Springfield M1 Garand was manufactured in July, 1944 and has a
barrel dated 3-54. So it probably was used in both WWII and Korea.
The 30 Cal MI Carbine is an Underwood and dated 11-1943. So also
probably used in WWII and Korea.









____________________________
charles in KY
 

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