Model 60

Discussion in 'Marlin Rimfires' started by duster066, Feb 11, 2012.

  1. Ickaber

    Ickaber Well-Known Member

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    Storm, that's not what I wanted to hear. You were supposed to tell me how easy it was. :)

    Spud, I've watched all of those videos; thanks for posting them. I've seen others mention Citristrip before. But, I've got some other stripper in the garage, so it will get the first shot at it. If it doesn't work, I may have to try the Citristrip.

    If/when I get it done, I'll let you know how it goes. I've ordered the feedthroat conversion kit for it, as it will hardly feed at all at the moment. I want to make sure it shoots well before I worry too much about the finish.

    Thanks for the info.
     
  2. Spud9

    Spud9 Well-Known Member

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    My suggestion would be to disassemble and clean thoroughly, check feed throat for cracks or burs... file and polish, polish all interals and reassemble. I would do a complete tuning before ordering parts. You may get a new feed throat and still have to do the same filing and polishing to it. I have tuned a few and it makes all the difference in the world.
     

  3. Ickaber

    Ickaber Well-Known Member

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    Thanks for the advice Spud. I'll give it a try. I've got a Model 99 M1 as well. Between the two of them, one of them is bound to need an upgrade though. :)

    Since you've tuned a few of these up, what do you know about the ejector wire issue, as found over at RFC: http://www.rimfirecentral.com/forums/showthread.php?t=388240

    I'm pretty confused about that issue, since my M60 doesn't seem to have that wire. I took my M60 and my M99 apart and compared them yesterday, just to see if I was missing something. They are almost identical, except for the tail end of the lifter is a bit different. Much longer on the M99. If I can, I'll see about uploading a pic of the two side by side.
     
  4. Ickaber

    Ickaber Well-Known Member

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    The bottom is the 99 M1 and the top is the 60. (Notice the buffers are installed backwards of each other.) And notice the lifter's long tail in the 99.
    [​IMG]

    The left is the 99 M1 and the right is the 60. Pretty much identical. The 60 isn't feeding much at all at the moment. From what I can tell, the rounds are pointed up at about a 60-degree angle, while still in the feedthroat before being fed forward. So, not surprisingly, they're hitting high above the chamber.
    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Oct 2, 2012
  5. Spud9

    Spud9 Well-Known Member

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    Looking at both of them I don't see the left side of the wire on either one. The left side of the lifter wire should come up to a notch on the left side of the feed throat then bend slightly into the feed throat area. I will the guns I have worked on have been mostly early to mid 80's models. I will have to take apart my 70 and 60's guns and compare. I really haven't had any ftf issue for a long time. I will get to them and take some pics and compare. Let you know what I find soon. The link on RFC takes you to another link about the Model 60 which is very helpful. The nickle trick might work too, if it got bent back and is catching on the bolt. And the posts keep coming... get back soon.....
    As for the lifter being longer on one compared to the other... that is probably just a year of manufacture thing... I will check all mine out for that too.
     
  6. Ickaber

    Ickaber Well-Known Member

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    The parts from Brownells arrived today. Unfortunately, I won't have time to look at anything until some evening this next week. But, on the new feedthroat, I can see the notch for the ejector wire. That definitely doesn't exist on my others, so I think that's a date of manufacture thing, like you said. My 60 is a '72 and I think I figured the 99 was a '68, if I recall correctly. It's not serialized, so not as easy to check.
     
  7. Spud9

    Spud9 Well-Known Member

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    Here is some info on dating older Marlins.


    Marlin year of manufacture maybe determined from the following list of letter/numeral prefixs to the serial number; this coding only applies to serialized rifles:

    1946-C
    1947-D
    1948-E
    1949-F
    1950-G
    1951-H
    1952-J
    1953-K
    1954-L
    1955-M
    1956-N
    1957-P
    1958-R
    1959-S
    1960 (August)-1961-U
    1961 (August)-1962-V
    1963-W
    1964-Y,-Z
    1965-AA
    1966-AB
    1967-AC
    1968-AD, -68
    1969-69
    1970-70
    1971-71
    1972-72

    Starting in 1973, the year of manufacture maybe determined by subtracting the first two digits of the serial number from 100:
    Example: SN 2512345 would have been made in 1975 [100 - 25 = 75] and SN 94365295 would have been made in 2006 [ 100 - 94 = 06 (2006) ].

    For Marlin Rimfire Rifles [non-serialized]:

    From 1962 thru 1968 Marlins rimfire rifles (other than the 39 series lever actions) used a two letter date code that was stamped on the barrel. This date code is different than the one already listed, as Marlin rimfire rifles (other than the model 39 series) did not have a serial numbers until required to by Law after 1968. The first letter of the date code represented the month of manufacture while the second letter indicated the year. This date code was usually stamped on the left side of the barrel just in front of the receiver. The first letter of the date code is as follows:

    A = Jan.
    B = Feb.
    C = Mar.
    D = Apr.
    E = May
    F = June
    G = July
    H = Aug.
    I = Sep.
    J = Oct.
    K = Nov.
    L = Dec.

    The second letter of the date code is as follows:

    F = 1962
    G = 1963
    H = 1964
    I = 1965
    J = 1966
    K = 1967
    L = 1968

    So a date code of "JK" would in and SN 94365295 would have been made in 2006 [ 100 - 94 = 06 (2006) ].

    For Marlin Rimfire Rifles [non-serialized]:

    From 1962 thru 1968 Marlins rimfire rifles (other than the 39 series lever actions) used a two letter date code that was stamped on the barrel. This date code is different than the one already listed, as Marlin rimfire rifles (other than the model 39 series) did not have a serial numbers until required to by Law after 1968. The first letter of the date code represented the month of manufacture while the second letter indicated the year. This date code was usually stamped on the left side of the barrel just in front of the receiver. The first letter of the date code is as follows:

    A = Jan.
    B = Feb.
    C = Mar.
    D = Apr.
    E = May
    F = June
    G = July
    H = Aug.
    I = Sep.
    J = Oct.
    K = Nov.
    L = Dec.

    The second letter of the date code is as follows:

    F = 1962
    G = 1963
    H = 1964
    I = 1965
    J = 1966
    K = 1967
    L = 1968

    So a date code of "JK" would indicate that rifle was made in October of 1967.
     
  8. Ickaber

    Ickaber Well-Known Member

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    Well, since the parts were here and already paid for, I went ahead and installed the new feedthroat. Since it's designed with one edge beveled and the other square, it doesn't fit the old bolt. So I filed off the one edge, very slowly with a fine toothed file, until it fit and they slide smoothly together. I also drilled one side rail to accomodate the additional post of the new feedthroat design. (The old ones have three, the new ones have four.)

    I installed the new feedthroat, lifter, and lifter spring/ejector wire. But, the new style bolt must have a groove for the ejector wire that the old one doesn't, because mine just scraped the inside top of the bolt as it cycled, scratching the bolt and bending the wire. I ended up taking the new lifter spring/ejector wire out and putting in the old lifter spring again, since it doesn't have the part that comes up over the top of the feedthroat.

    After putting it all back together, it feeds great. Sort of. If I put one round in and cycle it, it feeds every time without fail. If I put multiple rounds in it stops feeding so well due to the fact that the extractors won't let go of the first one. I think this was a contributing factor previously, but don't think it was the entire issue, since I initially couldn't even get the first round to feed. So I no longer have failure to feed issues, but failure to eject issues. Again, I know the latter probably was contributing to the former, but don't think it was the whole problem. (When I took it all apart, it looked like a previous owner must have buried it in sand once upon a time. It was filthy.)

    So, first off, how the heck are the extractors supposed to work? They grab ahold and pull the spent casing out and back, but what is supposed to cause them to let go so it can be spit out the side? I can't find any mechanism that looks like it would contribute to this process. Maybe this is the reason for the later redesign and inclusion of the ejector wire?

    One of the extractors (the left one) moves easily by hand. The other (the right one) is much stiffer. I checked my model 99 and it is the same. I even tried putting the 99's bolt in the 60, but while they look identical, they are enough different that it won't slide smoothly. I'd like to take the extractors out and make sure there's no grit behind them, but I don't have a punch small enough to do it.

    Any thoughts or suggestions?

    Spud, thanks for the dating info. (That sounds weird. :) ) My 60 is a '72, which I knew. Turns out the 99 is a '67, since it's stamped "DK".
     
    Last edited: Oct 1, 2012
  9. Ickaber

    Ickaber Well-Known Member

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    SUCCESS!!

    So just minutes after posting the above, I started re-reading the post over at RFC about adjusting using the nickel trick.

    When I got to the gigantic pictures of someone using the nickel method, I noticed that their ejector wire lays flat against the top of the feedthroat while mine, when nickle high, is up in the air above the feedthroat. So I reshaped my wire a bit, bringing it down to about half a nickel high and running parallel to the top surface of the feedthroat, rather than angling up as it goes. It's also angled laterally about half a nickel to the inside of the feedthroat. After the reshaping of the wire, I just cycled several rounds through successfully, with them ejecting quite nicely out the side. Woohoo!

    I'll try to get it to the range in the next couple of days and see how she does. Assuming success -- I know what happens when you ASS+U+ME -- I can get back to my original job of wanting to refinish the stock. Thanks for the feedback everyone, and especially Spud.

    I am still curious how these early models were supposed to ever eject though, since they didn't seem to have the wires. Although, I did see someone over at RFC mention adjusting their ejector wire on a '72, which is what mine is. So either they already did the upgrade that I just did, or maybe my wire broke? What are the chances of that on both the 99 and 60 that I've bought in the last couple of months though?

    Spud, if you get a chance to look at your older ones, I'd be really curious as to what you find with regards to the ejector wire.

    Thanks.

    Ickaber

    P.S. I just noticed that the 99 has a 4-post feedthroat. Maybe I'll try dropping a new one into that as well so I can also use the ejector wire, but won't have to drill the side rail.
     
    Last edited: Oct 1, 2012
  10. Ickaber

    Ickaber Well-Known Member

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    I guess I still have a little angle up. But, it's working now so I'm not complaining.

    [​IMG]
     
  11. Spud9

    Spud9 Well-Known Member

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    That pic is what mine looks like with the wire. I will be taking mine apart probably on Wed. I have been swamped getting my shop ready to start smithing.... refinish/refurb/anodizine/bluing,etc... One more day!!! Next week I have 7 guns to work on so I will be getting back to you soon. I am glad you had some success with this.
     
  12. Ickaber

    Ickaber Well-Known Member

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    Are you smithing just for fun? It sounds like you'll have quite the setup. I need to figure out a good way to put some blue back on the 10/22 I inherited from my dad. Any suggestions?

    One other thing I thought I'd mention on my 60, in case it helps anyone else out at some point. After filing down my new feedthroat, it fit nicely into the block, but wouldn't slide smoothly forward; there was a definite sticking point. What I ended up finding was that the very front edge of the block was actually bent in just a hair, causing a slight lip that would catch the feedthroat as it passed. It looked to me that it must have been caused by slamming into the barrel over the years. The metal gave just a tiny bit, but enough to cause it to catch. The old feedthroat probably wore down with it over time, so didn't have the issue. So, I just filed that front edge of the block just a bit, and then everything moved smoothly.
     
    Last edited: Oct 2, 2012
  13. Spud9

    Spud9 Well-Known Member

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    That feed throat bump I found in one of the ones I was working on. Just a hair off. It is amazing how something that minute can screw things up.

    I will send you pics once I get the whole shop done and up and running. I am opening a fluff and buff gunsmith shop, primarily for 22's but I have experience with a few others. Going to polish, brush, anodize, jewel, cold blue, hot oil blue, tune, stocks refurb, builds, trigger jobs, etc..I am applying for FFL to do it right. But I will be working on the pile of guns I bought a couple of weeks ago. I will try and keep a photo log and post the progress. A couple of 10/22's a few Glenfield 60's with squirrels, a 795 and M99 M1. I have my own work to do, then use it as advertising for business.

    check out thread https://www.marlinforum.com/forum/f5/starting-redo-my-marlins-673/

    Nice to see you found the bleb of a problem...
     
    Last edited: Oct 2, 2012
  14. Spud9

    Spud9 Well-Known Member

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  15. Ickaber

    Ickaber Well-Known Member

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    I've seen the cold blues, but wasn't sure how well they worked. I need to redo the whole barrel on this old '68 10/22 that I inherited. Sounds pretty doable.

    Thanks for everything and good luck with your shop.
     
  16. Spud9

    Spud9 Well-Known Member

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    Thanks...

    If you are doing the whole barrel, [ame]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MrOgIgvSqO8[/ame] check out this video. There is some prep work at turning the barrel in a lathe, preferably and getting a long enough trough to warm the barrel in water (heats more evenly). But all in all, real simple.
     
  17. Ickaber

    Ickaber Well-Known Member

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    I love Mr. Potterfield. I've watched many of his videos and he always makes it look so easy. Unfortunately, I don't have a lathe, which is how he polishes the barrel too. I suppose I could do it by hand, it would just take a lot longer.
     
  18. Spud9

    Spud9 Well-Known Member

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    Set the barrel in a vise with a rubber grip, Horizontal, with more than half the barrel above the vise and the lower part up against the bench. Use a long strip of wet sandpaper start with 320 or 400 and work your way down. Don't pull too hard, you won't need to. Turn the barrel approx 1/3 around and do it again, etc... then the bottom. Work your way up 600/800 depending on the look you want. The trick is butting the barrel below the vise against the bench. A lathe is much faster but sometimes you have to make do. Good luck.. I am sure it will come out great.
     
  19. Ickaber

    Ickaber Well-Known Member

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    Not being a man of unlimited funds, I pretty much always have to make do. But, that's okay, I've learned a lot that way. Consequently, my wife and kids think I can fix anything. And I can live with that.
     
  20. Spud9

    Spud9 Well-Known Member

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    The problem there is your "Honey Do" list gets so big you have no time to play with your toys.