Shooting uphill / downhill bullet arc.

Discussion in 'Hunting Forum' started by greyhawk50, Oct 29, 2012.

  1. greyhawk50

    greyhawk50 Well-Known Member

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    There is a lot of info on-line about this subject. Some are even in the easy to understand video format. I've even spoke to a couple Pro Hunting Guides that agree with the on-line information.

    Based on my experience (and the fact that I have a thick head), I have a tendency to not totally agree.
    When I hunted in Pa., there was a lot of uphill/downhill shots. Anywhere from 30-50 degrees. The shots were anywhere from 50 yards to 130 yards.
    The first experience was with a Vintage Military Japanese 7.7 at 50 yards, with iron sights, downhill at about 30 degrees. That was the only center-fire rifle that I owned at the time. The bullet drop should have been a moot point. I aimed center mass chest area and the point of impact broke the deers spine just above the shoulder. I thought it was me but couldn't understand because I didn't recall pulling the shot. Didn't matter, deer was down.
    Another experience was with a 270 at about 125 yards. This time, I had a 3X9 optics set on 9. The angle was about 35 degrees downhill. Again, bullet drop should have been minimal at that range. Again, using proper control, I pressed off the shot. The deer dropped like a rock. Again, the bullet broke his spine above the shoulder. Again, it seemed strange but the deer was down.
    The third experience was with a Marlin 30-30, from a high bluff, shooting downhill at a 45 degree angle if not slightly more. I was using iron sights. The estimated distance was 100 yards. Again, bullet drop should have been minimal at that range. It was a quartering shot with the deer coming at me. I pressed off the first shot and the deer froze in the "saw horse" position with his head lowered (nose almost touching the ground) and his legs spread evenly in all four directions. He just stood there while I sent (embarrassed to admit) 10 more rounds his way. That required reloading my 336 (twice). Long story short, I finally concluded that I was shooting over his back. At that point, I forced myself to aim about 10" low, below his body line. That shot dropped the deer. Later investigation showed that the first bullet took a small chunk out of the top of his head, between the antlers. He was KOed on his feet.
    No information on-line tells you to shoot 10"-12" low at a 45 degree angle with a 30-30 at 100 yards. I swear to you, that is what it took. Gravity has that much effect. Even using on-line calculations, the distance would have been about 50 yards and with iron sights, mounted on the barrel, the comp wouldn't be more than an inch or two.
    I couldn't find it but the best explanation that I have seen is a video of a guy using a wimpy 8' Fly Rod and holding it at different angles to explain the basics.
    What are your thoughts and/or experiences?????
    I know we have some military marksmen on here. Give us some insight, please.
     
    Last edited: Oct 29, 2012
  2. hombre243

    hombre243 Well-Known Member

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    bullet arc

    I read an article about bullet arc and either uphill or downhill ya have to aim low. I have seen the diagram explaining this but basically, aim low.

    Here is a link to a post from Chuck Hawks:

    http://www.chuckhawks.com/shooting_uphill.htm
     
    Last edited: Oct 29, 2012

  3. SWO1

    SWO1 Well-Known Member Lifetime Supporting

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    AIM LOW.....TO HIT HIGH.....Seems contradictory to most people, but a rule of physics of bullet balistics. Most articles on the subject say under 100 yds, no compasation. I say 200. But guess it all really depends on a lot of things, The weapon, the round, barometric pressure, price of tea in china...ect.

    Best thing to do is PRACTICE with your chosen components in the situation you are most likly to hunt in. I zero my deer rifles in at 75 yds. BUT...I do know where they shoot at, 50, 100, 125. Thats my shooting lanes where I hunt. If I am going somewhere else I scout the area first, with a range finder, make note of firng lanes with distance and zero my gun for the best and most likly distance. But I also know the point of impact at lesser and futherest distances is.
     
  4. greyhawk50

    greyhawk50 Well-Known Member

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    There are several sources on-line. Here are a couple more.
    [ame]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wTSBcNgGMNo[/ame]
    [ame]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1mhX4VQb-A4[/ame]

    Experience tells me that the closer one gets to vertical, things change, somehow????
     
  5. SWO1

    SWO1 Well-Known Member Lifetime Supporting

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    Finally found the text taught at sniper school. Its a long article about ranging. Toward the end is the part about Uphill/Downhill shooting. Pretty simple and IT WORKS...or has for me !!

    http://www.ultimatesniper.com/Docs/46.PDF
     
  6. SHOOTER13

    SHOOTER13 RETIRED MODERATOR Lifetime Supporting

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    Good info gentlemen...a shot on target is never made on a level field.
     
  7. greyhawk50

    greyhawk50 Well-Known Member

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    As you live and hunt in Pa., you know of what I speaketh.
    If you find a level spot to shoot from, you may get hit by a semi. :p or an SUV. :eek:
     
  8. SHOOTER13

    SHOOTER13 RETIRED MODERATOR Lifetime Supporting

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