Winchester Low Wall

Discussion in 'Other Guns' started by mm93, Aug 25, 2017.

  1. mm93

    mm93 Well-Known Member

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    Another old single shot to add to my collection. One of the few non Marlin Ballard guns, and my only Winchester. Found this 1885 Low Wall at our recent two day collectors gun show at Oregon Arms Collectors.

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    The 1885 has a #5 weight Stevens-Pope barrel in .22LR on it. Larger than the receiver in diameter, so it was reduced down at the receiver face to fit the 1885. Bore is like new, so it should be a great shooting gun! Scope is an old 1920's Belding & Mull telescope. Buttstock is a custom built one, and it appears it was once a straight grip and adapted to pistol grip. Original forearm wood was opened up to fit this huge barrel.

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    My 2nd Pope barreled rifle, and excited to find it at a price lower than most Low walls. The buttstock needs a darker stain, so I'll strip it and match it to the forearm better. Forearm has a small area on the bottom that is flattened and once had a palm rest mounted. Filling that in with donor walnut to make it better. Should be a fun gun project, and great shooting collectible!
     
  2. mm93

    mm93 Well-Known Member

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    Been doing some sprucing up on the 1885, and I think it's done, other than allowing a few weeks to totally dry before waxing the stocks. The forearm came out better than I thought, and I found a replacement for my beloved Tapaderas N35 Win. red (ran out, and it seems they're out of business). Went to my local Woodcrafters and the guy there directed me towards "Transtint Bight Red" dye. It did a great job of duplicating the old Win. color from the 1800's! I used N35 on the buttstock, and the Transtint on the forearm, and got a good match.
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    And even more surprising was the deep cleaning I did on the barrel! I scraped the rust spots with a penny, and then went over them with 4/0 steel wool and 50-50 mix of acetone-ATF. Took all the loose stuff off the barrel, but left the patches of lightly pitted metal. I then took a very small 1/2"x1" long wood block, and wrapped it with 240 grit emery paper. I worked the pits out, and then used Oxpho Blue to touch up the bare spots. The barrel looks very nice, and no sign of the bad spots or repairs showing!
    Done for now, and probably hit the range next week to see how it shoots!
     

  3. Gumpy

    Gumpy AKA Richard Prestage

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    That sure is a pretty rifle! Let us know how it shoots.
     
  4. mm93

    mm93 Well-Known Member

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    Thanks Gumpy! Bottom of that forearm was a mess, with it being flattened, and numerous mounting holes!

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  5. squirrelhunter

    squirrelhunter Well-Known Member Lifetime Supporting

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    Great looking rifle,hope it's a tack driver,might be a great squirrel gun :D.
     
  6. mm93

    mm93 Well-Known Member

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    Might be, but at nearly 14 lbs. a bit heavy to pack very far! That's a massive barrel, with a tiny hole!
     
  7. squirrelhunter

    squirrelhunter Well-Known Member Lifetime Supporting

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    Yeah,it's like a bull barrel which is usually a lot more accurate ;).
     
  8. mm93

    mm93 Well-Known Member

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    Yes, it's a bull barrel on steroids! I've never seen another Stevens-Pope barrel of this size in .22LR. But considering they made probably less than 1800 barrels, there's not a bunch in any weight or contour.